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When should you see your doctor about bladder spasms?

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Call your doctor if you have:

If you have or think you're having bladder spasms, see the doctor for a proper diagnosis. Your symptoms may result from an infection that can be treated. It's rare, but bladder spasms can be a sign of a serious underlying condition.

  • Pain or cramping in your pelvic or lower abdominal area
  • Pain or burning when you pee
  • Urgent or frequent need to go
  • Urine leaks
  • Blood in your urine

From: Bladder Spasms WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse web site: "Nerve Disease and Bladder Control."

FamilyDoctor.org web site: "Interstitial Cystitis."

American Family Physician web site: "Interstitial Cystitis: Urgency and Frequency Syndrome."

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse web site: "Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome."

AARP web site: "Overactive Bladder: How to Take Back Control."

Wein: Campbell-Walsh Urology,  ; chapter 119. 10th. ed.

Botulinum toxin-A intradetrusor injections in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic literature review, Game X.  , June 1, 2009. J Pediatr Urol

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Institutes of Medicine.

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on July 3, 2018

SOURCES:

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse web site: "Nerve Disease and Bladder Control."

FamilyDoctor.org web site: "Interstitial Cystitis."

American Family Physician web site: "Interstitial Cystitis: Urgency and Frequency Syndrome."

The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse web site: "Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome."

AARP web site: "Overactive Bladder: How to Take Back Control."

Wein: Campbell-Walsh Urology,  ; chapter 119. 10th. ed.

Botulinum toxin-A intradetrusor injections in children with neurogenic detrusor overactivity/neurogenic overactive bladder: a systematic literature review, Game X.  , June 1, 2009. J Pediatr Urol

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Institutes of Medicine.

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on July 3, 2018

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