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Are supplements tested?

ANSWER

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates dietary supplements, but it treats them like foods rather than medications. Unlike drug manufacturers, the makers of supplements don’t have to show their products are safe or effective before selling them.

Some ingredients may have been tested in animal or human studies. For example, studies show that folic acid lowers the risk of birth defects for pregnant women. But other supplement ingredients haven't been studied well, or at all.

From: FAQs About Dietary Supplements WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "FDA 101: Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Food Facts."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 13, 2018

SOURCES:

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "FDA 101: Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Food Facts."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 13, 2018

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