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What are precautions when taking phenylalanine?

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Tell your doctor about any supplements you're taking, even if they're natural. That way, your doctor can check on any potential side effects or interactions with any medications.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does regulate dietary supplements. But it treats them like foods rather than medications. Unlike drug manufacturers, the makers of supplements don’t have to show their products are safe or effective before selling them on the market.

From: Phenylalanine WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Natural Standard Professional Monograph: "Phenylalanine."

AltCareDex, "Phenylalanine."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Vitiligo."

March of Dimes: "PKU (Phenylketonuria)."

Natural Standard Bottom Line Monograph: "Phenylalanine."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Phenylalanine."

Reviewed by Carmen Patrick Mohan on May 18, 2017

SOURCES:

Natural Standard Professional Monograph: "Phenylalanine."

AltCareDex, "Phenylalanine."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Vitiligo."

March of Dimes: "PKU (Phenylketonuria)."

Natural Standard Bottom Line Monograph: "Phenylalanine."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Phenylalanine."

Reviewed by Carmen Patrick Mohan on May 18, 2017

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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