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What are risks of taking pycnogenol?

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Pycnogenol is a compound from the bark of a European pine tree. It also can be extracted from peanut skin, grape seed, witch hazel bark, and other sources. Pycnogenol is thought to be an antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage.

Pycnogenol may stimulate your immune system. So it may not be safe to take if you have immune disorders, such as:

It’s unknown if pychogenol is safe for children or for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

  • Lupus
  • Multiple sclerosis (MS)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

From: Pycnogenol WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Pine Bark Extract."

Fundukian, L.J. editor, , third edition, 2009. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center web site: "About Herbs: Pine Bark Extract."

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database web site: "Pycnogenol."

Rakel, D. , 3rd edition,  Saunders, 2012. Integrative Medicine

Today's Dietitian: "Pycnogenol — Supplement Offers Promise for Managing a Variety of Conditions."  

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on May 29, 2019

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Pine Bark Extract."

Fundukian, L.J. editor, , third edition, 2009. The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center web site: "About Herbs: Pine Bark Extract."

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database web site: "Pycnogenol."

Rakel, D. , 3rd edition,  Saunders, 2012. Integrative Medicine

Today's Dietitian: "Pycnogenol — Supplement Offers Promise for Managing a Variety of Conditions."  

Reviewed by Christine Mikstas on May 29, 2019

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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