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What are the risks of taking vitamin K?

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Side effects of oral vitamin K at recommended doses are rare. Many drugs can interfere with the effects of vitamin K. They include antacids, blood thinners, antibiotics, aspirin, and drugs for cancer, seizures, high cholesterol, and other conditions.

You should not use vitamin K supplements unless your health care provider tells you to. People using Coumadin for heart problems, clotting disorders, or other conditions may need to watch their diets closely to control the amount of vitamin K they take in. They should not use vitamin K supplements unless advised to do so by their health care provider.

From: Vitamin K WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Longe, J., ed. , second edition, 2004. Natural Standard Patient Monograph: "Vitamin K." Office of Dietary Supplements: "Important information to know when you are taking Coumadin and Vitamin K." Vermeer, C. 2000. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc," 2002. Shiraki, M. 2000. Cockayne, S. 2006. Tamura, T. 2007.







The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative MedicineHematology/Oncology Clinics of North America,Journal of Bone and Mineral Research,Archives of Internal Medicine,Archives of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 4, 2018

SOURCES: Longe, J., ed. , second edition, 2004. Natural Standard Patient Monograph: "Vitamin K." Office of Dietary Supplements: "Important information to know when you are taking Coumadin and Vitamin K." Vermeer, C. 2000. National Academies Press: "Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc," 2002. Shiraki, M. 2000. Cockayne, S. 2006. Tamura, T. 2007.







The Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative MedicineHematology/Oncology Clinics of North America,Journal of Bone and Mineral Research,Archives of Internal Medicine,Archives of Internal Medicine,

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 4, 2018

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