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What's the difference between RDA and DV?

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Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) is the amount of a certain nutrient you should get each day based on your age, gender, and whether you're pregnant or breastfeeding.

On a supplement label, you're more likely to see "DV," which stands for daily value. This represents how much of a nutrient the supplement provides relative to a total daily diet. For example, a calcium supplement labeled "50% DV" has 500 mg of calcium per serving, because the DV for calcium is 1,000 mg per day. Sometimes the DV in a supplement will be higher than the RDA for certain people.

There's no DV for many supplements, so the label will show that, too. Check with your doctor to make sure you're not taking too much of any nutrient.

From: FAQs About Dietary Supplements WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "FDA 101: Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Food Facts."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 13, 2018

SOURCES:

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "FDA 101: Dietary Supplements."

FDA: "Food Facts."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Dietary Supplements: What You Need to Know."

NIH Office of Dietary Supplements: "Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on November 13, 2018

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What should you do if you have a problem from taking a dietary supplement?

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