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Which foods contain ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)?

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EDTA is a molecule called a chelating agent, which grab and stick to other molecules. EDTA is added to some foods and drinks to help them keep their color and flavor. They include:

The FDA says EDTA is considered safe for use in foods in the U.S.

  • Sodas
  • Canned fruits and vegetables
  • Non-nutritive sweeteners
  • Condiments such as mayonnaise
  • Salad dressings

SOURCES:

News releases, Natural Standard.

News release, FDA.

FDA web site: "Warning Letter NYK-2011-02," "Food Additives List."

Science News , Sept. 13, 1997.

Rakel, R.E., editor, 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2011. Textbook of Family Medicine,

Natural Standard: "Chelation."

Curr Cardiol Rep. : "EDTA Chelation Therapy to Reduce Cardiovascular Events in Persons with Diabetes." 

JAMA : "Effect of disodium EDTA chelation regimen on cardiovascular events in patients with previous myocardial infarction: The TACT Randomized Trial."

Circulation : "Clinical benefit of EDTA chelation therapy in patients with diabetes in the trial to assess chelation therapy (TACT)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 26, 2020

SOURCES:

News releases, Natural Standard.

News release, FDA.

FDA web site: "Warning Letter NYK-2011-02," "Food Additives List."

Science News , Sept. 13, 1997.

Rakel, R.E., editor, 8th edition, Saunders Elsevier, 2011. Textbook of Family Medicine,

Natural Standard: "Chelation."

Curr Cardiol Rep. : "EDTA Chelation Therapy to Reduce Cardiovascular Events in Persons with Diabetes." 

JAMA : "Effect of disodium EDTA chelation regimen on cardiovascular events in patients with previous myocardial infarction: The TACT Randomized Trial."

Circulation : "Clinical benefit of EDTA chelation therapy in patients with diabetes in the trial to assess chelation therapy (TACT)."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on March 26, 2020

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