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    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE (PEA)

    Other Names:

    Hydroxyethylpalmitamide, Impulsin, N-(2-Hydroxyethyl) hexadecanamide, N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)palmitamide, Palmidrol, Palmitamide MEA, Palmitic Acid Monoethanolamide, Palmitoylethanolamine, PEA.

    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Overview
    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Uses
    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Side Effects
    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Interactions
    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Dosing
    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Overview Information

    Palmitoylethanolamide is a chemical made from fat. It is found naturally in foods such as egg yolks and peanuts, and in the human body. It is also used as a medicine.

    Palmitoylethanolamide is used for pain, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis (MS), carpal tunnel syndrome, infections of the airway, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

    How does it work?

    Palmitoylethanolamide is a chemical that can bind to cells in the body and reduce pain and swelling.

    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Uses & Effectiveness What is this?

    Possibly Effective for:

    • Pain. Some research shows that taking a specific type of palmitoylethanolamide (Normast, Epitech Group) can reduce pain in people with chronic pain due to various causes.

    Possibly Ineffective for:

    • A muscle control disorder marked by involuntary movements and muscle tightness (spasticity). Research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide does not reduce spasticity of the spine or help with sleep problems in people with spinal cord injury.

    Insufficient Evidence for:

    • Lou Gehrig's disease (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS). In people with ALS, early research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide with the medication riluzole might improve how well the lungs work.
    • Carpal tunnel syndrome. Early research suggests that taking palmitoylethanolamide might reduce some of the pain and discomfort of carpal tunnel syndrome.
    • Nerve pain in people with diabetes (diabetic neuropathy). Early research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide might reduce nerve pain in people with diabetic neuropathy.
    • Fibromyalgia. Early research in patients with fibromyalgia suggests that adding palmitoylethanolamide to other standard medications for fibromyalgia might help to reduce pain.
    • A group of eye disorders that can lead to vision loss (glaucoma). Glaucoma is caused by high pressure in the eye. Palmitoylethanolamide seems to reduce intraocular pressure in people with glaucoma or at risk of glaucoma. It also seems to reduce intraocular pressure in people that had surgery to prevent glaucoma.
    • Multiple sclerosis (MS). Early research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide might help improve symptoms in people with MS who are receiving treatment with the medication interferon-beta1a. However, there are now better medications available to treat MS. It is not known if taking palmitoylethanolamide along with using these newer medications would be helpful.
    • Nerve pain. There are some reports of people having less nerve pain when they take palmitoylethanolamide. However, high-quality research is mixed. Some research in large groups of people show that taking palmitoylethanolamide might reduce pain in people with sciatica. But it might be less effective in people with nerve pain due to injury to the spine. More research is needed to clarify if palmitoylethanolamide is helpful for people with different kinds of nerve pain.
    • Pain after surgery. Early research suggests that taking a specific type of palmitoylethanolamide might reduce pain after having a tooth removed.
    • Infection of the airways. Some early research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide might reduce the risk of developing a lung infection in adults and children. But not all research agrees.
    • A group of painful conditions that affect the jaw joint and muscle (temporomandibular disorders or TMD). Early research shows that taking palmitoylethanolamide might reduce pain and allow the mouth to open better in people with arthritis of the jaw joint.
    • Headaches.
    • Illness from a Shigella bacteria infection (shigellosis).
    • Autism.
    • Memory.
    • Depression.
    • Eczema.
    • A painful uterine disorder (endometriosis).
    • Eye conditions.
    • Long-term swelling (inflammation) in the digestive tract (inflammatory bowel disease or IBD).
    • Kidney disease.
    • Stroke.
    • Vulvar pain.
    • Weight loss.
    • Withdrawal from marijuana.
    • Dry skin.
    • Others.
    More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of palmitoylethanolamide for these uses.

    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Side Effects & Safety

    When taken by mouth: Taking palmitoylethanolamide is POSSIBLY SAFE for most adults when used for up to 3 months. Possible side effects, such as upset stomach, are very rare. There isn't enough reliable information to know if palmitoylethanolamide is safe to use for longer than 3 months.

    When applied to the skin: There isn't enough reliable information to know if palmitoylethanolamide is safe to use or what the side effects might be.

    Special Precautions & Warnings:

    Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn't enough reliable information to know if palmitoylethanolamide is safe to use when pregnant or breast feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Interactions What is this?

    We currently have no information for PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Interactions

    PALMITOYLETHANOLAMIDE PEA Dosing

    The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

    ADULTS

    BY MOUTH:

    • Pain: Palmitoylethanolamide 300-1,200 mg daily for up to 60 days.

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    Conditions of Use and Important Information: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

    This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.

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