BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENE

OTHER NAME(S):

2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-creosol, BHT, Butil Hidroxitolueno, Butylated Hydroxytoluene, Butylhydroxytoluene, Butylhydroxytolu&egrave;ne, Butyl Hydroxytolu&egrave;ne, Dibutylated Hydroxytoluene, Dibutylhydroxytolu&egrave;ne, Hydroxytolu&egrave;ne Butylé.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) is a lab-made chemical that is added to foods as a preservative. People also use it as medicine.

BHT is used to treat genital herpes and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

Some people apply BHT directly to the skin for cold sores.

How does it work?

BHT is an antioxidant. It may damage the protective outer layer of viral cells. This may keep the viruses from multiplying and/or doing more damage.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Cold sores caused by a type of virus called herpes. Developing evidence suggests that putting BHT on cold sores may help them heal faster.
  • Genital herpes.
  • Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of BHT for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

BHT is safe in the amounts found in processed foods. But there isn’t enough information to know if it is safe to take BHT in medicinal doses, which are typically higher. There also isn’t enough information to know whether BHT can be safely used on the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: BHT is safe when eaten as food, but there's not enough information to know if it's safe in the larger amounts that are used as medicine. If you are pregnant or breast-feeding, stick with food amounts until more is known.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of BHT depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for BHT. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Botterweck AA, Verhagen H, Goldbohm RA, et al. Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk: results from analyses in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Food Chem Toxicol 2000;38:599-605.. View abstract.
  • Coohill TP, Babich M, Taylor WD, Snipes W. A comparison of herpes simplex virus plaque development after viral treatment with anti-DNA or antilipid agents. Biophys J 1980;30:517-21.. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182
  • Freeman DJ, Wenerstrom G, Spruance SL. Treatment of recurrent herpes simplex labialis with topical butylated hydroxytoluene. Clin Pharmacol Ther 1985;38:56-9.. View abstract.
  • Grogan MW. Toxicity from BHT ingestion. West J Med 1986;145:245-6.
  • Reimund E. Butylated hydroxytoluene, lipid-enveloped viruses, and AIDS. Med Hypotheses 1987;23:39-42.. View abstract.
  • Shlian DM, Goldstone J. More on BHT toxicity. West J Med 1986;145:699.
  • Shlian DM, Goldstone J. Toxicity of butylated hydroxytoluene. N Engl J Med 1986;314:648-9.
  • Williams GM, Iatropoulos MJ, Whysner J. Safety assessment of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene as antioxidant food additives. Food Chem Toxicol 1999;37:1027-38.. View abstract.

More Resources for BUTYLATED HYDROXYTOLUENE

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version. © Therapeutic Research Faculty 2009.