Overview

1,3-DMAA is a drug made synthetically in a laboratory. It was originally used as a nasal decongestant. Today, 1,3-DMAA is sold as a dietary supplement used for attention deficit-hyperactive disorder (ADHD), weight loss, improving athletic performance, and body building.

Some products claim that 1,3-DMAA naturally comes from rose geranium oil. Supplements that contain this ingredient sometimes list rose geranium, geranium oil, or geranium stems on the label. However, laboratory analysis shows that this drug probably does not come from this natural source. It is thought that these manufacturers have artificially added this drug to the supplement rather than obtaining it from a natural source. 1,3-DMAA is considered a drug in Canada and is not permitted in dietary supplements or natural health products.

Many athletes take 1,3-DMAA to improve performance. However, 1,3-DMAA was added to the World Anti-Doping Agency's prohibited substances list in 2010. Therefore, competitive athletes should avoid taking it.

Due to safety concerns, 1,3-DMAA has been removed from military stores in the US. It has also been banned in New Zealand. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) considers supplements containing 1,3-DMAA to be illegal. Its use has been linked to several reports of serious, life-threatening side effects.

How does it work ?

1,3-DMAA is thought to have stimulant effects similar to decongestants such as pseudoephedrine, ephedrine, and others. Some promoters say that it is a safer alternative to ephedrine. But there is no scientific information to back up this claim.

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