BETAINE HYDROCHLORIDE

OTHER NAME(S):

Acide Chlorhydrique de Bétaïne, Betaine, Bétaïne, Betaine Chlorhydrate, Betaine HCl, Bétaïne HCl, Betaine Hydrochloric Acid, Chlorhidrato de Betaína, Chlorhydrate de Bétaïne, Chlorhydrate de Triméthylglycine, TMG, Trimethyl Glycine, Trimethylglycine, Triméthylglycine, Trimethylglycine hydrochloride.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Betaine hydrochloride is a chemical substance made in a laboratory. It is used as medicine.

Betaine hydrochloride has an interesting history. Betaine hydrochloride used to be included in over-the-counter (OTC) products as a “stomach acidifier and digestive aid.” But a federal law that went into effect in 1993 banned betaine hydrochloride from use in OTC products because there wasn’t enough evidence to classify it “generally recognized as safe and effective.” Betaine hydrochloride is now available only as a dietary supplement whose purity and strength can vary. Promoters still claim that some health conditions are due to inadequate stomach acid, but this claim has not been proven. Even if it were true, betaine hydrochloride wouldn’t help. It only delivers hydrochloric acid but does not itself alter stomach acidity.

Betaine hydrochloride is also used to treat abnormally low levels of potassium (hypokalemia), hay fever, “tired blood” (anemia), asthma, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), yeast infections, diarrhea, food allergies, gallstones, inner ear infections, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and thyroid disorders. It is also used to protect the liver.

Don’t confuse betaine hydrochloride with betaine anhydrous. Use only the FDA-approved betaine anhydrous product for the treatment of high levels of homocysteine in the urine (homocystinuria). This is a symptom of some rare genetic diseases.

How does it work?

It isn't known how betaine hydrochloride might work.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Low potassium.
  • Hay fever.
  • Anemia.
  • Asthma.
  • “Hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis).
  • Yeast infection.
  • Diarrhea.
  • Food allergies.
  • Gallstones.
  • Inner ear infection.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
  • Protecting the liver.
  • Thyroid disorders.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of betaine hydrochloride for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

There isn't enough information to know if betaine hydrochloride is safe. It might cause heartburn.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of betaine hydrochloride during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Peptic ulcer disease: There is a concern that the hydrochloric acid produced from betaine hydrochloride might irritate stomach ulcers or keep them from healing.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for BETAINE HYDROCHLORIDE Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of betaine hydrochloride depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for betaine hydrochloride. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Anon. Betaine. Monograph. Altern Med Rev 2003;8:193-6. View abstract.
  • Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. PART 310 - New Drugs. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=310.540.
  • Leiper JB, Maughan RJ. Absorption of water and solute from glucose-electrolyte solutions in the human jejunum: effect of citrate or betaine. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1989 Nov;24(9):1089-94. View abstract.
  • Ostojic SM, Niess B, Stojanovic M, Obrenovic M. Co-administration of methyl donors along with guanidinoacetic acid reduces the incidence of hyperhomocysteinaemia compared with guanidinoacetic acid administration alone. Br J Nutr. 2013 Sep 14;110(5):865-70. View abstract.
  • Yago MR, Frymoyer A, Benet LZ, Smelick GS, Frassetto LA, Ding X, Dean B, Salphati L, Budha N, Jin JY, Dresser MJ, Ware JA. The use of betaine HCl to enhance dasatinib absorption in healthy volunteers with rabeprazole-induced hypochlorhydria. AAPS J. 2014 Nov;16(6):1358-65. View abstract.
  • Yago MR, Frymoyer AR, Smelick GS, Frassetto LA, Budha NR, Dresser MJ, Ware JA, Benet LZ. Gastric reacidification with betaine HCl in healthy volunteers with rabeprazole-induced hypochlorhydria. Mol Pharm. 2013 Nov 4;10(11):4032-7. View abstract.

More Resources for BETAINE HYDROCHLORIDE

CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.