BROOM CORN

OTHER NAME(S):

Andropogon sorghum, Blé de Guinée, Darri, Durri, Guinea Corn, Holcus bicolor, Milium nigricans, Millet, Panicum caffrorum, Sorgho, Sorgho à Balais, Sorgho Commun, Sorgho à Graine, Sorgho Vulgaire, Sorghum, Sorghum bicolor, Sorghum vulgare, Sorgo.<br/><br/>

Overview

Overview Information

Broom corn is a plant. The seed is used to make medicine.

People use broom corn to treat digestion problems.

In foods, broom corn is used as a cereal grain.

How does it work?

Broom corn seems to have a soothing effect on the digestive system.

Uses

Uses & Effectiveness?

Insufficient Evidence for

  • Digestion problems.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of broom corn for these uses.

Side Effects

Side Effects & Safety

Broom corn is LIKELY SAFE when eaten in food amounts. However, it is not known if broom corn is safe in amounts greater than that found in foods or what the possible side effects might be.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking broom corn if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Interactions

Interactions?

We currently have no information for BROOM CORN Interactions.

Dosing

Dosing

The appropriate dose of broom corn depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for broom corn. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

View References

REFERENCES:

  • Bhatia IS, Gumber SC, and Singh R. Metabolism of free sugars in relation to starch synthesis in the developing SORGHUM vulgare grain. Physiologia Plantarum 1980;49(2):248-254.
  • Bleiberg, F., Brun, T. A., Goihman, S., and Lippman, D. Food intake and energy expenditure of male and female farmers from Upper-Volta. Br.J Nutr 1981;45(3):505-515. View abstract.
  • Deosthale, Y. G. and Gopalan, C. The effect of molybdenum levels in sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Pers.) on uric acid and copper excretion in man. Br.J.Nutr. 1974;31(3):351-355. View abstract.
  • Derman, D. P., Bothwell, T. H., Torrance, J. D., Bezwoda, W. R., MacPhail, A. P., Kew, M. C., Sayers, M. H., Disler, P. B., and Charlton, R. W. Iron absorption from maize (Zea mays) and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) beer. Br.J.Nutr. 1980;43(2):271-279. View abstract.
  • Gaffa, T., Jideani, I. A., and Nkama, I. Traditional production, consumption and storage of Kunu--a non alcoholic cereal beverage. Plant.Foods Hum.Nutr 2002;57(1):73-81. View abstract.
  • Gillooly, M., Bothwell, T. H., Charlton, R. W., Torrance, J. D., Bezwoda, W. R., MacPhail, A. P., Derman, D. P., Novelli, L., Morrall, P., and Mayet, F. Factors affecting the absorption of iron from cereals. Br.J Nutr 1984;51(1):37-46. View abstract.
  • Gustafson, G. L. and Gander, J. E. Uridine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase from Sorghum vulgare. Purification and kinetic properties. J Biol.Chem. 3-10-1972;247(5):1387-1397. View abstract.
  • Hemalatha, S., Platel, K., and Srinivasan, K. Influence of heat processing on the bioaccessibility of zinc and iron from cereals and pulses consumed in India. J Trace Elem.Med Biol. 2007;21(1):1-7. View abstract.
  • Hirel B and Gadal P. Glutamine synthetase isoforms in leaves of a C<sub>4</sub> plant: SORGHUM vulgare. Physiologia Plantarum 1982;54(1):69-74.
  • Kumar A. Chemical examination of SORGHUM vulgare roots. Q.J.Crude Drug Res 1978;16:119-120.
  • Pawar SS. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in SORGHUM vulgare (Jawar) pollen-induced allergic bronchial asthma [Abstract] 2003. The Cochrane Library 2009;(2)
  • Rengasamy, A., Selvam, R., and Gnanam, A. Isolation and properties of an acid phosphatase from thylakoid membranes of Sorghum vulgare. Arch Biochem.Biophys. 1981;209(1):230-236. View abstract.
  • Tuna, E. and Bressani, R. [Chemical composition of 11 varieties of sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) before and after popping the kernels]. Arch Latinoam.Nutr 1992;42(3):291-300. View abstract.

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CONDITIONS OF USE AND IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This information is meant to supplement, not replace advice from your doctor or healthcare provider and is not meant to cover all possible uses, precautions, interactions or adverse effects. This information may not fit your specific health circumstances. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified health care provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor or health care professional before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your health care plan or treatment and to determine what course of therapy is right for you.

This copyrighted material is provided by Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Consumer Version. Information from this source is evidence-based and objective, and without commercial influence. For professional medical information on natural medicines, see Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database Professional Version.
© Therapeutic Research Faculty 2018.