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What happens after an endometrial biopsy?

ANSWER

It’s common to have some light spotting after this type of biopsy. You may also have some cramping. If so, ask your doctor which over-the-counter pain relievers are safe for you to take. Some, like aspirin, could make you bleed more.

You can return to your normal routine as soon as you feel able, but skip sex until all your bleeding has stopped.

From: What Is an Endometrial Biopsy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Endometrial Cancer.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Derby Teaching Hospitals/NHS Foundation Trust: “Having an inpatient hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy.”

American Academy of Family Physicians/Familydoctor.org: “Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.”

American Cancer Society: “How is Uterine Sarcoma Diagnosed?”

NYU Langone Medical Center/Perlmutter Cancer Center: “Diagnosing Endometrial Cancer.”

American Family Physician: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Reviewed by Kecia Gaither on May 2, 2019

SOURCES:

Cleveland Clinic: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Mayo Clinic: “Endometrial Cancer.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Derby Teaching Hospitals/NHS Foundation Trust: “Having an inpatient hysteroscopy and endometrial biopsy.”

American Academy of Family Physicians/Familydoctor.org: “Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.”

American Cancer Society: “How is Uterine Sarcoma Diagnosed?”

NYU Langone Medical Center/Perlmutter Cancer Center: “Diagnosing Endometrial Cancer.”

American Family Physician: “Endometrial Biopsy.”

Reviewed by Kecia Gaither on May 2, 2019

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What do my endometrial biopsy results mean?

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