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How do women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) experience depression?

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The key element that sets apart premenstrual syndrome (PMS)-related depression from other forms of depression is the timing of symptoms. The hallmark of PMS-related problems is their occurrence during the two weeks prior to the onset of menstruation (around the time of ovulation). Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is a more severe subtype of PMS that involves more types of emotional symptoms (such as sadness, anxiety, mood swings, irritability, and loss of interest in things).

From: Depression and PMS WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCE: 

Forrester-Knauss C. , Oct. 2011. BMC Public Health

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on October 13, 2017

SOURCE: 

Forrester-Knauss C. , Oct. 2011. BMC Public Health

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on October 13, 2017

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What should you do if you think you have symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS)?

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