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How are eye problems related to Graves' disease diagnosed?

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If you think you might have Graves' ophthalmopathy, or eye problems related to your Graves’ disease, you may need an endocrinologist (a doctor who specializes in problems with hormones) and an ophthalmologist (eye doctor). If you know you have Graves' disease, your doctor should be able to find out if you have the eye problem with a standard eye exam.

In some cases, you may need blood tests, or imaging tests like a computerized tomography (CT) scan or a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. With a CT scan, X-rays are taken from different angles and put together to make a more complete picture. An MRI uses powerful magnets and radio waves to make detailed images.

If you haven't been diagnosed with Graves' disease, step one probably will be to get your thyroid hormone levels checked with a simple blood test.

American Thyroid Association: "Graves' Disease," "Hyperthyroidism (Overactive)."

New England Journal of Medicine: "Graves’ Ophthalmopathy."

Medical Clinics of North America: "The Evaluation and Treatment of Graves Ophthalmopathy."

University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center: "Thyroid Eye Disease (TED or Graves Eye Disease)."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on January 18, 2021

American Thyroid Association: "Graves' Disease," "Hyperthyroidism (Overactive)."

New England Journal of Medicine: "Graves’ Ophthalmopathy."

Medical Clinics of North America: "The Evaluation and Treatment of Graves Ophthalmopathy."

University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center: "Thyroid Eye Disease (TED or Graves Eye Disease)."

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on January 18, 2021

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How are eye problems related to Graves' disease treated?

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