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How are tablets and suppositories used to treat vaginal yeast infection?

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Some of the meds (such as clotrimazole and miconazole) that are in vaginal creams are available as vaginal tablets or suppositories to treat yeast infections. You insert these into the vagina and let them dissolve. Some brands call them "ovules" because they're oval-shaped. These products often come packaged with a plastic inserter that helps you put the medication into the vagina. Suppositories are less messy than a vaginal cream and less likely to ooze out during the day. And with tablets or suppositories, you use the doses for fewer days, so you get symptom relief sooner.

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Vaginitis: Causes and Treatments."

National Library of Medicine: "Vaginal Yeast Infection," "Vaginal Itching."

National Women's Health Information Center: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

CDC: "Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Treatment Guidelines 2006: Vulvovaginal Candidiasis."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 16, 2020

SOURCES:

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Vaginitis: Causes and Treatments."

National Library of Medicine: "Vaginal Yeast Infection," "Vaginal Itching."

National Women's Health Information Center: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

CDC: "Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Treatment Guidelines 2006: Vulvovaginal Candidiasis."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Vaginal Yeast Infections."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on January 16, 2020

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When should I call my doctor about vaginal itching, burning, and irritation?

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