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What causes nausea during a period?

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Nausea is a normal part of your period.

One of the hormones released during your cycle is called prostaglandin. Though most of it sheds with the uterine lining, some gets into your bloodstream. This can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headaches.

Many over-the-counter pain medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen cut down on prostaglandin production and may help ease these symptoms as well.

From: Common Period Problems WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Center for Young Women's Health: "Menstrual Periods."

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: "Women & Their Menstrual Cycles."

Center for Young Women's Health: "Menstrual Cramps."

Cleveland Clinic: "Menstrual Cycle."

National Health Service UK: "Heavy periods."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Heavy Menstrual Bleeding."

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: "Using Foods Against Menstrual Pain."

Mayo Clinic: "Menstrual Cycle: What's normal, what's not."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 9, 2017

SOURCES:

Center for Young Women's Health: "Menstrual Periods."

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: "Women & Their Menstrual Cycles."

Center for Young Women's Health: "Menstrual Cramps."

Cleveland Clinic: "Menstrual Cycle."

National Health Service UK: "Heavy periods."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Heavy Menstrual Bleeding."

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine: "Using Foods Against Menstrual Pain."

Mayo Clinic: "Menstrual Cycle: What's normal, what's not."

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on March 9, 2017

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