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What is an apical prolapse?

ANSWER

There are three kinds of apical prolapse.

If you have enterocele, it means your small intestine has dropped down and is bulging into the upper part of the back wall of your vagina. This can also happen at the top of your vagina, where the intestine sits on top and sinks down into it.

Uterine is when your uterus drops into your vagina. It's the second most common kind of pelvic organ prolapse, and it gets more likely as you get older.

Vaginal vault can happen after a hysterectomy. Your vagina may drop down toward its opening between your legs because the uterus is no longer there for the vagina to hold on to. In severe cases, your vagina could turn inside out and fall through the vaginal opening.

SOURCES:

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

American Urogynecologic Society: “POP Symptoms & Types.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder).”

Women’s Health Foundation: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

Oxford Gynaecology: “Vaginal Vault Prolapse.”

Reviewed by Kecia Gaither on May 02, 2019

SOURCES:

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

American Urogynecologic Society: “POP Symptoms & Types.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Cystocele (Prolapsed Bladder).”

Women’s Health Foundation: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

Oxford Gynaecology: “Vaginal Vault Prolapse.”

Reviewed by Kecia Gaither on May 02, 2019

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