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What is an ovarian cyst?

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Ovarian cysts are common, especially with women who still get their periods. They’re solid or fluid-filled pockets in or on your ovary. Most of the time they’re painless and harmless. You might get one every month as part of your cycle and never know it. They usually go away on their own without treatment. Cysts are also common when you’re pregnant.

A cyst becomes a problem when it doesn’t go away or gets bigger.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Ovarian Cyst”

Mayo Clinic: Diseases and Conditions, Ovarian cysts, “Definition”

American Family Physician : “Ovarian Cysts and Ovarian Cancer”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Ovarian cysts”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “Ovarian cysts”

Lourdes Health System: “Ovarian Cysts”

The Center for Innovative Gyn Care: “Ovarian Cysts”

American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Ovarian Cysts”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 29, 2020

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Ovarian Cyst”

Mayo Clinic: Diseases and Conditions, Ovarian cysts, “Definition”

American Family Physician : “Ovarian Cysts and Ovarian Cancer”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Ovarian cysts”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “Ovarian cysts”

Lourdes Health System: “Ovarian Cysts”

The Center for Innovative Gyn Care: “Ovarian Cysts”

American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Ovarian Cysts”

Reviewed by Hansa D. Bhargava on July 29, 2020

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What are the symptoms of an ovarian cyst?

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