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What is mold?

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Mold is a type of fungus that consists of small organisms found almost everywhere. They can be black, white, orange, green, or purple. Outdoors, molds play an important role in nature, breaking down dead leaves, plants, and trees. Molds thrive on moisture and reproduce by means of tiny, lightweight spores that travel through the air. You’re exposed to mold every day. In small amounts, mold spores are usually harmless, but when they land on a damp spot in your home, they can start to grow. When mold is growing on a surface, spores can be released into the air where they can be easily inhaled. If you're sensitive to mold and inhale a large number of spores, you could experience health problems.

SOURCES:

United States Environmental Protection Agency: "A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home.''

Rhode Island Department of Heath: ''Some Basic Facts About Mold and Mildew.''

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission: ''Biological Pollutants in Your Home.''

University of Minnesota Extension: ''Molds - Your Safe Home.''

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 11, 2019

SOURCES:

United States Environmental Protection Agency: "A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home.''

Rhode Island Department of Heath: ''Some Basic Facts About Mold and Mildew.''

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission: ''Biological Pollutants in Your Home.''

University of Minnesota Extension: ''Molds - Your Safe Home.''

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 11, 2019

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Where do molds grow?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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