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What is obliterative surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP)?

ANSWER

Obliterative surgery is one of 2 types of surgery to correct pelvic organ prolapse. It narrows or closes off part or all of the vagina. The goal is to provide more support to the bladder or other organs that have dropped out of their normal positions and are pressing against the walls of the vagina. This may be an option if surgery hasn’t worked and you can’t tolerate another procedure. After this operation you will no longer be able to have sexual intercourse.

SOURCES:

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

Baylor College of Medicine: “Anterior and Posterior Repair (Colporrhaphy),” “Laparoscopic Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery,” “Prolapse Surgery.”

International Urogynecological Association: “Sacrospinous fixation/Uterosacral Ligament Suspension,” “Sacrocolpopexy” “Vaginal Repair with Mesh.”

UpToDate: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Women: Obliterative Procedures (Colpocleisis).”

FDA press release, January 4, 2016.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on January 30, 2019

SOURCES:

American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse.”

Baylor College of Medicine: “Anterior and Posterior Repair (Colporrhaphy),” “Laparoscopic Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery,” “Prolapse Surgery.”

International Urogynecological Association: “Sacrospinous fixation/Uterosacral Ligament Suspension,” “Sacrocolpopexy” “Vaginal Repair with Mesh.”

UpToDate: “Pelvic Organ Prolapse in Women: Obliterative Procedures (Colpocleisis).”

FDA press release, January 4, 2016.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on January 30, 2019

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What is reconstructive surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP)?

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