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Do fibroids go away after pregnancy?

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Fibroids often shrink after pregnancy. In one study, researchers found that, 3 to 6 months after delivery, 70% of women who had live births saw their fibroids shrink more than 50%.

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on November 8, 2020

Medically Reviewed on 11/8/2020

SOURCES:

Harvard Medical School: “What to do about Fibroids.”

Reviews in Obstetrics & Gynecology: “Contemporary Management of Fibroids in Pregnancy.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Uterine Fibroids Fact Sheet.”

New York State Department of Health: “Uterine Fibroids.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Uterine fibroids fact sheet.”

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Postpartum factors and natural fibroid regression.”

Obstetrics and Gynecology International: “Counselling Patients with Uterine Fibroids: A Review of the Management and Complications.”

Mayo Clinic: “Placental abruption”

 

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on November 8, 2020

SOURCES:

Harvard Medical School: “What to do about Fibroids.”

Reviews in Obstetrics & Gynecology: “Contemporary Management of Fibroids in Pregnancy.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Uterine Fibroids Fact Sheet.”

New York State Department of Health: “Uterine Fibroids.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Uterine fibroids fact sheet.”

American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology: “Postpartum factors and natural fibroid regression.”

Obstetrics and Gynecology International: “Counselling Patients with Uterine Fibroids: A Review of the Management and Complications.”

Mayo Clinic: “Placental abruption”

 

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on November 8, 2020

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I have uterine fibroids. Will an IUD help?

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