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  • Question 1/10

    Which medication should not be used to relieve your child’s pain and fever?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which medication should not be used to relieve your child’s pain and fever?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Adults can use aspirin to treat pain and fever, but you should never give it to a child. It can cause a serious condition called Reye’s syndrome that can harm the brain and liver.  Both ibuprofen and acetaminophen are fine to use in children.

  • Question 1/10

    To figure out the right dose for your child, you should first use:

  • Answer 1/10

    To figure out the right dose for your child, you should first use:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    How much she weighs should be your go-to when reading a dosing chart. If you don’t know that, use her age. Talk with your doctor if you’re having trouble.

  • Answer 1/10

    What’s the best way to give adult medicine to children?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Kids aren’t just smaller adults. They react to medications differently than grown-ups do. In fact, some medicines, like aspirin, can be harmful to children. Never give adult meds to your child without talking to your doctor first.

  • Question 1/10

    If your child throws up after you give her ibuprofen, you can give her another dose right away.

  • Answer 1/10

    If your child throws up after you give her ibuprofen, you can give her another dose right away.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    In most cases, wait at least 6 hours before trying again. The only exceptions are if you gave it to her in pill form and you can see she threw up the whole pill, or if you know she didn’t swallow the medicine before she vomited.

  • Answer 1/10

    What’s the best way to get rid of unused medicines?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The FDA says you should pair them with a “yuck” factor before you toss them. That way, your kids won’t be tempted to pull them out of the trash. Don’t pour them down the sink or toilet, or into the soil, either. That can harm the environment. The medicine could also pass to others through your water system.  Check with your local government. It may have a disposal center.

  • Question 1/10

    How long after the expiration date is it safe to use over-the-counter (OTC) children’s medicine?

  • Answer 1/10

    How long after the expiration date is it safe to use over-the-counter (OTC) children’s medicine?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The only risk is that the meds may be weaker than they should be. So if you want to be 100% sure the medicine works as well as it can, use it before the date stamped on the bottle.

  • Question 1/10

    Which medication will last longer in your child’s system?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which medication will last longer in your child’s system?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Doctors say your kid can go 6-8 hours between doses of ibuprofen. You need to give her acetaminophen every 4-6 hours. You shouldn’t give your child more than five doses of acetaminophen in 24 hours. For ibuprofen, it’s four in 24 hours.

  • Question 1/10

    In the U.S., most ibuprofen overdoses happen in children.

  • Answer 1/10

    In the U.S., most ibuprofen overdoses happen in children.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Most happen to kids under the age of 5. Symptoms are usually mild, and include diarrhea and vomiting. In serious cases, your child could have a seizure or fall into a coma. Always follow the directions on the box carefully. If you have any questions, call your child’s doctor.

  • Question 1/10

    At which age can your child start to take over-the-counter cold and cough medicines?

  • Answer 1/10

    At which age can your child start to take over-the-counter cold and cough medicines?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The American Academy of Pediatrics says cough and cold medications aren’t safe for kids under 4. They can have serious side effects. What’s more, they don’t give kids much relief before then. 

  • Question 1/10

    Where’s the safest place to store your child’s medication?

  • Answer 1/10

    Where’s the safest place to store your child’s medication?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s good to put them up high where your kids can’t see them, but it’s better to put them in a locked cabinet. Kids can get nosy -- and climb. The CDC says 60,000 kids go to the hospital each year because they get into medicines they shouldn’t. Remove all doubt. Lock them up.

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Sources | Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on September 18, 2018 Medically Reviewed on September 18, 2018

Reviewed by Dan Brennan, MD on
September 18, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Reye’s Syndrome,” “Fever and Pain Medicine: How Much To Give Your Child,” “Cough and Cold Medicine - Not for Children.”

FDA: “Giving Medication to Children,” “How to Dispose of Unused Medicines.”

KidsHealth: “How to Safely Give Ibuprofen,” “How to Safely Give Acetaminophen.”

Harvard Medical School: “Drug Expiration Dates -- Do They Mean Anything?”

Medscape: “Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID) Toxicity.”

American Academy of Family Physicians: “Child Safety: Keeping Medicines Out of Reach.”

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