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Amyloidosis

Important
It is possible that the main title of the report Amyloidosis is not the name you expected.

Disorder Subdivisions

  • familial amyloidosis
  • primary amyloidosis
  • secondary amyloidosis
  • senile amyloidosis

General Discussion

Amyloidosis is a systemic disorder that is classified into several types. The different types of systemic amyloidosis are classified as primary, secondary or familial (hereditary). Primary amyloidosis (also called AL, or ‘light chain') is the most common type of systemic amyloidosis. AL results from an abnormality (dyscrasia) of plasma cells (a type of white blood cell) in the bone marrow and is closely related to multiple myeloma. Secondary (AA) amyloidosis is derived from the inflammatory protein serum amyloid A. AA occurs in association with chronic inflammatory disease such as the rheumatic diseases, familial Mediterranean fever, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, tuberculosis or empyema. Familial amyloidosis is a rare type of amyloidosis that is caused by an abnormal gene. There are several abnormal genes that can cause hereditary amyloidosis, but the most common type of hereditary amyloidosis is called ATTR and caused by mutations in the transthyretin (TTR) gene.

Senile amyloidosis, in which the amyloid is derived from wild-type (normal) transthyretin, is a slowly progressive disease that affects the hearts of elderly men. Amyloid deposits may occasionally occur in isolation without evidence of a systemic disease; isolated bladder or tracheal amyloid are the most common such presentations.

Resources

International Myeloma Foundation
12650 Riverside Drive
Suite 206
North Hollywood, CA 91607
USA
Tel: (818)487-7455
Fax: (818)487-7454
Tel: (800)452-2873
Email: TheIMF@myeloma.org
Internet: http://www.myeloma.org

Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation
383 Main Avenue
5th Floor
Norwalk, CT 06851
USA
Tel: (203)229-0464
Fax: (203)229-0572
Email: info@themmrf.org
Internet: http://www.themmrf.org/

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311
TDD: (888)205-3223
Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

Amyloidosis Support Groups
232 Orchard Drive
Wood Dale, IL 60191
Tel: (847)350-7540
Fax: (847)350-0577
Tel: (866)404-7539
Email: muriel@finkelsupply.com
Internet: http://www.amyloidosissupport.com

Amyloidosis Foundation
7151 N. Main Street
Suite 2
Clarkston, MI 48346
Tel: (248)922-9610
Fax: (248)922-9620
Tel: (877)269-5643
Email: modonnell@amyloidosisresearchfoundation.org
Internet: http://www.amyloidosis.org

Who is Amy?
3856 Winona Ct.
Denver, CO 80212
Tel: (303)917-9888
Fax: (720)536-4661
Email: becca.barry@whoisamy.org
Internet: http://www.whoisamy.org

For a Complete Report:

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated:  3/12/2013
Copyright  1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2013 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization of Rare Disorders

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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