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  • Question 1/12

    What causes animal allergies?

  • Answer 1/12

    What causes animal allergies?

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    It isn’t just Fluffy’s furry coat that’s making you sneeze. And it isn’t just those sloughed-off skin cells called dander, either. Pet allergies can be a reaction to some harmless proteins the animal gives off. Or there can be allergens inhis fur or dander. They might also be in his pee and saliva.

  • Question 1/12

    Can you have hay fever in the winter?

  • Answer 1/12

    Can you have hay fever in the winter?

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    Hay fever, aka seasonal allergies, is mostly caused by pollen. It usually starts to bother you in the late summer and early fall. But experts say that a warm winter can lead to a pollen season that lasts weeks longer than before.

    In some areas, the fine yellow dust that comes from mountain cedars can trigger symptoms from mid-December into February. Mold spores, which can grow in freezing temperatures, also cause winter allergies.

  • Question 1/12

    If you have seasonal allergies, you might also be allergic to:

  • Answer 1/12

    If you have seasonal allergies, you might also be allergic to:

    • You answered:
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    Some people who have seasonal allergies also get hives or itchiness in their mouth when they eat some raw fruits and vegetables. Certain proteins in these foods are similar to the ones found in pollen.

    Cooking usually changes these proteins enough that they don’t cause an allergic reaction. So you might get hives from biting into a Granny Smith, but not from apple pie.

  • Answer 1/12

    Anaphylaxis is:

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    Wheezing, itchy eyes, and a runny nose are all unpleasant. Anaphylaxis can be deadly. It’s a severe, whole-body reaction that gets worse soon after you come into contact with the thing you’re allergic to. Food, an insect sting, or even latex can start the process.

    Symptoms can include:

    • A swollen throat 
    • Trouble swallowing
    • Breathing problems
    • A sudden drop in blood pressure
    • Dizziness
    • Loss of consciousness
    • Facial swelling 

    Call 911 immediately if you have any of these symptoms or facial swelling.

  • Question 1/12

    Allergic reactions get milder the more often you’re exposed to an allergen.

  • Answer 1/12

    Allergic reactions get milder the more often you’re exposed to an allergen.

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    Some people do “outgrow” allergies. But usually once you’ve had an allergic reaction to something, there’s no way to predict how severe your next reaction will be. Some allergies, particularly those from insect stings, may get worse each time.

  • Question 1/12

    If you have allergies, your child will have them, too. 

  • Answer 1/12

    If you have allergies, your child will have them, too. 

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    • Correct Answer:

    Kids with allergic parents are more likely to have similar troubles themselves. But it’s entirely possible for a child to get allergies even though neither parent has ever had them.

  • Answer 1/12

    The best way to keep my child allergy-free is to:

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    Kids who get exposed to a wide variety of bacteria and allergy triggers while they’re young are less likely to get allergies later in life. Don’t be afraid of a little dirt!

  • Question 1/12

    Shots for seasonal allergies take years to work.

  • Answer 1/12

    Shots for seasonal allergies take years to work.

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    Immunotherapy, or “allergy shots,” can get you ready for allergy season within a few months. If you begin getting shots in January, there’s a good chance your body's defenses will be stronger by the time the pollen starts to fly.

     

  • Question 1/12

    What causes most fall allergies?

  • Answer 1/12

    What causes most fall allergies?

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    Most people think of pollen allergies as a springtime thing. But ragweed, which hits the air in late summer and early fall, is the 800-pound gorilla of sneeze-starters. A single ragweed plant can produce up to 1 billion pollen grains, each of which can travel more than 100 miles. To get ahead of ragweed season, start your allergy medications a couple of weeks before it’s set to start in your area.

  • Question 1/12

    Tiny creatures that lurk in your carpet and drapes and provoke an allergic reaction are called:

  • Answer 1/12

    Tiny creatures that lurk in your carpet and drapes and provoke an allergic reaction are called:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can’t see them without a microscope, but they can cause big problems if you have allergies or asthma. It’s actually a protein in their waste that you may be allergic to -- yep, dust mite poop. To crack down on these critters, cover all mattresses and pillows with zippered, dust-proof covers.

  • Answer 1/12

    The best tool to get rid of mold in your home is:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This type of filter traps mold spores before they get to you. It works much better than freestanding air cleaners. If you use humidifiers, dehumidifiers, or window-unit air conditioners, clean the fluid reservoirs often.

  • Answer 1/12

    To avoid things that set off seasonal allergies:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    During pollen season -- February or March through October, depending on where you live -- it’s a good idea to stay indoors when pollen counts are high.

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Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on February 01, 2017 Medically Reviewed on February 01, 2017

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
February 01, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology: “Anaphylaxis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Management,” “Asthma Statistics,” “Food Allergy: Tips to Remember,” “Global Warming Extends Ragweed Season,” “Outdoor Allergens: Tips to Remember,” “Pet Allergy Overview,” “Pine Tree Allergy,” “Prevention of Allergies and Asthma in Children: Tips to Remember,” “Ragweed plants packed with pollen.”

American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology: “Billions of Ragweed Pollen Grains Cause Most Seasonal Allergies,” “Spring Allergy Sufferers: Be Wary of Treatment Myths,” “Types of Allergies: Food Allergies.”

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America: “Dust Mites,” “Mold Allergy,” “Pet Allergies,” “Preventing Allergic Reactions and Controlling Allergies.”

British Columbia Drug and Poison Control Information Center: “Bee and Wasp Stings.”

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia: “Oral Allergy Syndrome.”

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: “Low diversity of the gut microbiota in infants with atopic eczema,” “Reduced diversity of the intestinal microbiota during infancy is associated with increased risk of allergic disease at school age.”

KidsHealth, the Nemours Foundation: “All About Allergies.”

James Sublett, MD, board-certified allergist, Family Allergy and Asthma, Louisville, KY.

News release, Johns Hopkins Medicine.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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