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    What's an Elimination Diet?

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    It’s not about  weight loss. You’re not out to delete unneeded calories or drop some extra pounds. Instead, the goal of an elimination diet is to pinpoint food that you might be sensitive to or allergic to.

    You’ll need to partner with your doctor on this and make sure that you still get all the nutrients you need.

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    This method takes several weeks. Don’t do it if you’ve had a severe allergic reaction (called anaphylaxis). If you have, you need to know your trigger food as soon as possible so you can avoid it. Talk with your doctor about that.

    How Does the Elimination Diet Work?

    The most common plan is to remove specific foods or ingredients from your diet because you and your doctor think they may be the reason for your allergy symptoms.

    Common allergy-causing foods include milk, eggs, nuts, wheat, and soy. Your doctor will supervise this diet over a few weeks.

    The first step is to stop eating the suspicious food(s). You’ll need to read food labels carefully and ask how foods are prepared at restaurants. Keep a food diary and write down everything you eat.

    Make sure you eat other foods that provide the same nutrients as the food you need to avoid. (For example, try tofu-based foods instead of dairy products.) A dietitian can help you plan meals.

    Then, you’ll slowly add back suspicious foods, one at a time. This process helps you know exactly which foods are a problem.

    In your food diary, note any symptoms that you get as you add each food back in.

    Lastly, you will once again stop eating the problem foods, one at a time. The list should be smaller this time. The goal is to see if the symptoms clear up for good.

    Keep in mind that you could be sensitive to a food but not allergic to it. Still, the elimination diet can help you know which foods you’re better off avoiding.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson, MD on November 18, 2014
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