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Allergies Health Center

Allergy Treatment

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There are lots of allergy treatment options. Over-the-counter and prescription medications can ease annoying symptoms. Allergy shots also help.

Treatment

Learn all about the different over-the-counter and prescription medicines that can help ease annoying symptoms.

When medicine is needed to stem allergy symptoms, antihistamines are often first in line. Find out how they can help and learn about possible side effects.

Learn how decongestants work – and who should not use them.

Atrovent nasal spray can help with certain allergy symptoms. Find out if it’s right for you.

Steroid nasal sprays are one of the strongest allergy medications. Find out how they work and how to use them.  

Find out when allergy eye drops can help and who should not use them.

These medications are fairly new to the allergy world. Find out if they’re right for you.

This type of medication can help but it’s all in the timing. Find out how to use it for best results.

For some people, allergy shots can mean the end to allergy medication. Find out all you need to know.

Advanced Reading: This article, written for doctors, provides in-depth information on skin allergy treatments.

If mold, mildew, or dust mite allergies are making you miserable, a home dehumidifier may help.

An auto-injector -- such as EpiPen, Twinject, or Auvi-Q -- can treat extreme allergic reactions with an early, life-saving dose of epinephrine.

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