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    Question 1/8

    Most people with psoriasis get psoriatic arthritis.

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    Answer 1/8

    Most people with psoriasis get psoriatic arthritis.

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    About a third of people who have psoriasis (red, raised, scaly patches on the skin) get psoriatic arthritis, a condition where your immune system attacks your joints. This kind of arthritis causes pain, stiffness, and swelling in joints, often in fingers and toes. It can also affect your lower back, wrists, knees, or ankles.

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    Question 2/8

    You're more likely to have psoriatic arthritis if:

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    Answer 2/8

    You're more likely to have psoriatic arthritis if:

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    Experts don't know all the reasons why some people get it and others don't, but the condition seems to run in families. Up to 40% of people with it have a family history of joint or skin disease. If you have a parent with psoriasis, you're more likely to get it and psoriatic arthritis, too.

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    Question 3/8

    A frozen bag of peas can ease your pain.

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    Answer 3/8

    A frozen bag of peas can ease your pain.

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    You don't have to eat them! Wrap the frozen bag (or a bag of ice) in a towel and put it on your achy, swollen joints for some temporary relief. The icy cold brings down inflammation.

    A warm bath or shower, a hot pack, or a warm towel can help with aching muscles, joint pain, and soreness.

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    Question 4/8

    The disease often causes problems with:

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    Answer 4/8

    The disease often causes problems with:

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    Crumbly or discolored nails are common with psoriatic arthritis. Sometimes, fingernails or toenails come away from the nail bed, or the nails look like they have tiny holes in them.

    People who have a lot of joint pain and skin patches tend to have the most damage to their nails.

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    Question 5/8

    How many types of psoriatic arthritis are there?

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    Answer 5/8

    How many types of psoriatic arthritis are there?

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    The condition can look different from person to person.

    One mild form affects five or more joints in pairs on both sides of your body, like both knees or both elbows.

    The other mild type can show up anywhere, usually in just a few joints. It could make fingers and toes swell up like sausages.

    Another kind of psoriatic arthritis mainly affects the ends of fingers or toes, including nails.

    The fourth type inflames the spine and makes moving painful and difficult.

    The last type, called arthritis mutilans, is the rarest. It can damage fingers and toes so badly that they don't work, and it often causes neck and lower back pain, too.

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    Question 6/8

    Which usually comes first?

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    Answer 6/8

    Which usually comes first?

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    Usually, people who get psoriatic arthritis already have psoriasis. If you have this skin condition, tell your doctor about any aches and pains.

    Symptoms of psoriatic arthritis can include stiffness, pain, throbbing, swelling and tenderness in joints, swollen fingers and toes, and even redness and pain in your eye. Early treatment can limit the damage it causes.

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    Question 7/8

    What's the best exercise for psoriatic arthritis?

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    Answer 7/8

    What's the best exercise for psoriatic arthritis?

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    Regular exercise can help with pain and make it easier for you to move. Exercise helps protect your joints by making the muscles around them stronger.

    Choose activities that are gentle on joints, like cycling and swimming. If you're not active now, go slow at first and get your doctor's OK. You can start with 5 minutes of easy walking and work your way up to 30 brisk minutes a day, most days of the week.

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    Question 8/8

    You can get rid of psoriatic arthritis.

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    Answer 8/8

    You can get rid of psoriatic arthritis.

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    While there's no cure, you can treat the pain, swelling, skin problems, and joint disease. That, plus exercise and a healthy lifestyle, makes a big difference. Your doctor might suggest aspirin and ibuprofen. If your symptoms are more severe, he might give you a prescription for drugs that lessen inflammation or work on your immune system.

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