Reviewed by Kathy Empen on June 18, 2012

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Tanya Altmann, MD, FAAP.

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Tanya Altmann, MD, FAAP: Viruses and respiratory infections are a lead trigger for wheezing in children with asthma. So if your child has asthma, you really want to protect them, give them the flu vaccine, make sure that other vaccines are up-to-date, teach them to wash their hands. You want to try to prevent them from getting sick. Also, talk to your doctor about medications to help prevent wheezing. Sometimes we put children on medication, so that way when they're exposed to their trigger, they won't get sick and start wheezing. There are in-health steroids, there are other oral medications that can help protect your lung and airways, if you're around that cat that you're allergic to. Or you're outside around the pollen, or you do catch a virus. We really want to help protect the wheezing, and then if your child is wheezing or having trouble breathing, talk to your pediatrician right away for treatment.