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    High Doses of Vitamin D May Cut Pregnancy Risks

    Study Shows 4,000 IU a Day of Vitamin D May Reduce Preterm Birth and Other Risks
    By
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

    May 4, 2010 -- Women who take high doses of vitamin D during pregnancy have a greatly reduced risk of complications, including gestational diabetes, preterm birth, and infection, new research suggests.

    Based on the findings, study researchers are recommending that pregnant women take 4,000 international units (IU) of vitamin D every day -- at least 10 times the amount recommended by various health groups.

    Women in the study who took 4,000 IU of the vitamin daily in their second and third trimesters showed no evidence of harm, but they had half the rate of pregnancy-related complications as women who took 400 IU of vitamin D every day, says neonatologist and study co-researcher Carol L. Wagner, MD, of the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Wagner acknowledges the recommendation may be controversial because very high doses of vitamin D have long been believed to cause birth defects.

    "Any doctor who hasn't followed the literature may be wary of telling their patients to take 4,000 IU of vitamin D," she says. "But there is no evidence that vitamin D supplementation is toxic, even at levels above 10,000 IU."

    Fewer Complications With High Vitamin D Doses

    Most prenatal vitamins have around 400 IU of vitamin D, and most health groups recommend taking no more than 2,000 IU of the vitamin in supplement form daily. Wagner says it took months to get permission to do a study in which pregnant women were given doses of the vitamin that were twice as high as this.

    The study included about 500 women in Charleston, S.C., who were in their third or fourth months of pregnancy. The women took 400 IU, 2,000 IU, or 4,000 IU of vitamin D daily until they delivered.

    Not surprisingly, women who took the highest doses of vitamin D were the least likely to have deficient or insufficient blood levels of the vitamin, as were their babies.

    These women also had the lowest rate of pregnancy-related complications.

    Compared to women who took 400 IU of vitamin D daily, those who took 4,000 IU were half as likely to develop gestational diabetes, pregnancy-related high blood pressure, or preeclampsia, Wagner says. They were also less likely to give birth prematurely.

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