Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Breast Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Metastatic Breast Cancer as a Chronic Condition

For women whose breast cancer has spread, treatments can improve their condition and add years to their life.
WebMD Feature

When a woman is first diagnosed with breast cancer -- any stage of breast cancer -- one of her greatest fears is "What if it's spread?"

Not long ago, a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, meaning the disease has spread well beyond the breast into places like the bones, lungs, or liver, meant it was time to get your affairs in order. In the 1970s, only 10% of women were still alive five years after a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer, according to a comprehensive review by the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, published in January 2004.

Recommended Related to Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer: Treatment by Stage

Breast cancer is a complex disease that’s different for every woman. Before you start a treatment, your doctor will want to know the size of the tumor and how far it has spread in your body, called the stage of the cancer. There are five basic stages, 0 through IV, and a number of sub-stages. Staging is a way for doctors to describe your condition. It doesn't tell the whole story, though. Your doctor will think about many things before she recommends treatments for you, including: The type...

Read the Breast Cancer: Treatment by Stage article > >

Today, say the MD Anderson researchers, as many as 40% of women with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer survive at least five years. "More and more, both doctors and patients approach it as a chronic condition," says Eric Winer, MD, director of the Breast Program at Boston's Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "We can't cure it, but we can manage it for many years."

Managing metastatic breast cancer as a chronic condition isn't the same as managing a disease like diabetes. "Diabetes, ultimately, can shorten one's life, but that's over the horizon of a few decades," Winer says.

"With breast cancer metastases, the majority of women know that this is an illness that's ultimately going to take their life. That may not be in a year or two or three, but it certainly tends to be in less than a decade."

However, enormous treatment improvements do mean that thousands of women are living longer and better lives even though they have metastatic breast cancer.

Treatments for Breast Cancer that Has Spread

Treatments for metastatic and earlier-stage breast cancer are very different. For earlier-stage breast cancer -- particularly for women who are relatively young and healthy -- doctors will often advise a very aggressive, rigorous course of treatment aimed at getting rid of the cancer completely. The side effects can be difficult, but there's a finish line in sight: initial breast cancer treatment usually lasts no more than six to nine months.

With metastatic cancer, some form of treatment will be a fact of life more or less from now on. This means the treatment philosophy changes. "We're looking to gain maximal control of the tumor at the lowest possible cost in terms of toxicity," says Clifford Hudis, MD, chief of the Breast Cancer Medicine Service at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Breast Cancer Overview
From self-exams and biopsies to reconstruction, we’ve got you covered.
Dealing with breast cancer
Get answers to your questions.
woman having mammogram
Experts don’t agree on all fronts, but you can be your own advocate.
woman undergoing breast cancer test
Many women worry. But the truth? Most abnormalities aren’t breast cancer.
Breast Cancer Treatments Improving
Resolved To Quit Smoking
Woman getting mammogram
Screening Tests for Women
ovarian cancer overview slideshow
serious woman
what is your cancer risk
10 Ways to Revitalize Slideshow