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    New Treatments for Breast Cancer

    These advances in treating breast cancer aren't on the horizon. They're here, right now.

    WebMD Feature

    While some promising new treatments for breast cancer are years away from regular treatment regimens, others are on the market or just around the corner.

    Still on the horizon for treating breast cancer are anti-angiogenesis drugs. They block the formation of new blood vessels that feed tumors and help them grow. These drugs have shown promise in treating colon cancer and are now being studied in patients with advanced breast cancer. But it may be some time before these drugs have been studied enough to make the leap to treating early-stage breast cancer.

    Recommended Related to Breast Cancer

    General Information About Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy

    Incidence Breast cancer is the most common cancer in pregnant and postpartum women and occurs in about 1 in 3,000 pregnant women. The average patient is between 32 to 38 years of age and because many women choose to delay childbearing, it is likely that the incidence of breast cancer during pregnancy will increase. Pathology Breast cancer pathology is similar in age-matched pregnant and nonpregnant women. Hormone receptor assays are usually negative in pregnant breast cancer...

    Read the General Information About Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy article > >

    Even so, new breast cancer treatments are available now. Over the past year, doctors have learned a lot more about many targeted therapies that very soon may be helping millions of women live longer and healthier lives after learning they have breast cancer.

    Abraxane and Albumin-Bound Nanoparticle Drugs

    In January, headlines trumpeted the release of a new chemotherapy drug for breast cancer called Abraxane. Technically, Abraxane isn't a new drug -- it's an exciting new way of delivering an existing drug.

    Paclitaxel, commonly marketed as Taxol or Taxotere, is part of many chemotherapy drug regimens, but it has one big problem, says Clifford Hudis, chief of the Breast Cancer Medicine Service at New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. "It doesn't dissolve in water, which means we have to put the drugs in solvents to deliver them to patients." Those solvents can cause a number of side effects, including severe allergic reactions. Patients taking paclitaxel have to receive heavy doses of other medications first, such as steroids and antihistamines, before getting their chemotherapy.

    Abraxane does a neat end run around that problem. A process called protein-bound nanoparticle technology creates tiny particles that bind the paclitaxel to a naturally occurring protein called albumin. "The binding makes little packets of paclitaxel -- think of them as little bubbles -- that can be dissolved in water," says Hudis. This means no more solvent, which in turn means no more medications before chemotherapy, and no more of the side effects that go along with them. It's also shortened the chemotherapy's infusion time from more than three hours to around half an hour.

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