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Eye Health Center

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How to Insert Eye Drops

  1. Before using eye drops, wash your hands with soap and warm water. Dry them with a clean towel.
  2. If you are putting in your own eye drops, lie down or use a mirror. It may be helpful to ask someone to check that you are getting the eye drops in your eye.
  3. Look up to the ceiling with both eyes.
  4. While tilting your head back, pull the lower lid of your eye down with one hand. Hold the eye drops bottle or tube in your other hand (rest part of your hand on your forehead if necessary to keep it steady).
  5. Place one eye drop or a small amount of ointment inside your lower lid. The tip of the medicine bottle or tube should not touch your eye.
  6. Blink and dab away the excess eye drop fluid with a tissue.
  7. If you are prescribed both eye drops and eye ointment, use the eye drops first, otherwise the ointment may block the absorption of the eye drops.
  8. If you have more than one type of eye drop to put in your eyes, wait about five minutes after the first medicine before putting in the second eye drop medicine.
  9. Keeping the eyes closed (without continued blinking) for a few minutes may allow better penetration and effectiveness of the medication.
  10. Immediately after using the eye drops, wash your hands to remove any medication that may be left on them.

If you have any questions, talk to your eye doctor.

Recommended Related to Eye Health

Living Well With Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Amy Atcha, 47, began to suspect there was something wrong when her 72-year-old mother, Judith Arcy, wasn't able to read a menu or see the numbers on her cell phone. After a visit to the ophthalmologist, her mother's diagnosis turned out to be age-related dry macular degeneration (AMD), a chronic, degenerative eye disease that causes central vision loss. AMD "doesn't come on all of a sudden," explains David M. Kleinman, MD, MBA, associate professor of ophthalmology at the Flaum Eye Institute, University...

Read the Living Well With Age-Related Macular Degeneration article > >

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on November 05, 2013

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