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How to Insert Eye Drops

  1. Before using eye drops, wash your hands with soap and warm water. Dry them with a clean towel.
  2. If you are putting in your own eye drops, lie down or use a mirror. It may be helpful to ask someone to check that you are getting the eye drops in your eye.
  3. Look up to the ceiling with both eyes.
  4. While tilting your head back, pull the lower lid of your eye down with one hand. Hold the eye drops bottle or tube in your other hand (rest part of your hand on your forehead if necessary to keep it steady).
  5. Place one eye drop or a small amount of ointment inside your lower lid. The tip of the medicine bottle or tube should not touch your eye.
  6. Blink and dab away the excess eye drop fluid with a tissue.
  7. If you are prescribed both eye drops and eye ointment, use the eye drops first, otherwise the ointment may block the absorption of the eye drops.
  8. If you have more than one type of eye drop to put in your eyes, wait about five minutes after the first medicine before putting in the second eye drop medicine.
  9. Keeping the eyes closed (without continued blinking) for a few minutes may allow better penetration and effectiveness of the medication.
  10. Immediately after using the eye drops, wash your hands to remove any medication that may be left on them.

If you have any questions, talk to your eye doctor.

 

Recommended Related to Eye Health

Computer Vision Syndrome

Staring at a computer monitor for hours on end has become a part of the modern workday. And inevitably, all of that staring can put a real strain on your eyes. The name for eye problems caused by computer use is computer vision syndrome (CVS). CVS is not one specific eye problem. Instead, the term encompasses a whole range of eyestrain and pain experienced by computer users. Research shows computer eye problems are common. Somewhere between 50% and 90% of people who work at a computer screen have...

Read the Computer Vision Syndrome article > >

 

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on November 05, 2013

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