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Quiz: Are Your Eyes Protected?

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You can "shoot your eye out" with a BB gun.

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You can "shoot your eye out" with a BB gun.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Your eyeballs are firmly attached to the optic nerve and eye muscles. You could hurt yourself -- and even go blind -- from a BB gun, but the chances of your eye actually coming out of its socket are slim. It’s more likely that you could puncture your eye. If that happens, you'll need an eye surgeon to try to stitch it back together.

 

Other things make it possible for your eyeball to come out of the socket, though. Some people are just born with loose tissue, so every now and then an eye might pop out a few millimeters. It could also happen if you're in a serious, high-impact accident. Usually an eye doctor can put the eyeball back in place without surgery (kind of like dealing with a dislocated shoulder).

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In a pinch, it's OK to use saliva to rewet your contact lenses.

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In a pinch, it's OK to use saliva to rewet your contact lenses.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Contact solution and saline drops are sterile. Your spit isn't; in fact, it's brimming with bacteria. So, licking your lenses could lead to a nasty infection. Tap water isn't a smart substitute, either. Water won't disinfect your lenses, and it too can lead to an infection. You're better off dealing with dry eyes until you get home to your contact solution or reach a drugstore.

You're fishing and a hook gets stuck in your eye. You should:

You're fishing and a hook gets stuck in your eye. You should:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Don't even think about playing eye doctor. To prevent more trauma and hopefully save your vision, head to the ER right away, so an expert can remove the hook. While you're in transit, don't touch the hook or put any pressure on it. Cover it. That helps prevent it from moving around until you get professional help.

Laser pointers marketed for kids or pets aren't powerful enough to hurt your vision.

Laser pointers marketed for kids or pets aren't powerful enough to hurt your vision.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

In theory, a laser-pointer should be OK if it has less than 5 milliwatts of output power -- but the FDA warns that many of these products are labeled wrong. Play it safe and don't buy these for your little ones or furry friends. If you need one for yourself, choose a laser that runs on button batteries. They tend to be less powerful compared to those that require AA or AAA batteries, or ones that come with a charger. Still, keep it out of reach of little ones.

"Snow blindness" happens when ...

"Snow blindness" happens when ...

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  • Correct Answer:

It’s not just your skin that needs sun protection. Your eyes can get sunburned on the beach, in a tanning salon (a bad idea for a number of reasons), or on the ski slopes. When it happens in wintry weather, it’s called snow blindness. The vision loss is temporary, but you may have pain, too. To sidestep this problem, put on UV-blocking sunglasses or snow goggles before you hit the slopes.

How many firework-related injuries involve eye damage?

How many firework-related injuries involve eye damage?

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  • Correct Answer:

Fireworks land 12,000 Americans in emergency rooms each year. Most of those folks don’t have eye injuries, but those who do often have serious damage, even blindness. The worst for eye injuries: bottle rockets.

To safely view a solar eclipse, you'll need:

To safely view a solar eclipse, you'll need:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

If you look directly at the sun during an eclipse, you could permanently damage your retina. That's the nerve tissue that detects light entering your eye. But it’s possible to take a peek without hurting your vision. One option: Buy No. 14 welder's glass, sold through welding supply outlets. You can also get a special solar filter for your telescope or camera, but make sure it's the right kind or you won't be protected. Contact a local astronomy club or planetarium for guidance.

If you cross your eyes, they can get stuck that way.

If you cross your eyes, they can get stuck that way.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Mom was wrong. Vision therapists actually have patients practice crossing their eyes to help improve their focusing skills.

 

Some people are born with, or develop, crossed eyes, though. It can run in families. Some kids grow out of it, and sometimes you can fix the problem by wearing glasses. But some kids will need surgery to realign the muscles. Left untreated, crossed eyes can make it harder to see in 3D as an adult.

Which sports cause the most eye injuries per year?

Which sports cause the most eye injuries per year?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

About 40,000 athletic-related eye injuries happen each year. Most of the damage is blunt trauma, which happens when something hits you in the eye. Just about any sport involving a ball, puck, bat, stick, racquet, or body contact is high-risk.

 

Black eyes are common, but broken bones under the eyeball and detached retinas are more serious. The overwhelming majority of sports-related eye injuries can be prevented. Talk to your doctor about how to guard your eyes while playing a specific sport, and to find out if you should wear protective lenses.

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
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Great job! When it comes to knowing how to protect your eyes, your vision is 20/20!

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