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Health Care Reform:

Health Insurance & Affordable Care Act

Quiz: Health Care Reform Myth or Fact?

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Because of health care reform, you have to change your insurance plan.

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Because of health care reform, you have to change your insurance plan.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

If you're currently covered by a health plan that follows the law and you’re happy with it, you can keep it.

On the other hand, if you don't like your current plan or you want another type of insurance, the Affordable Care Act lets you choose a different one. It's up to you.

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Who can use the new health insurance Marketplaces?

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Who can use the new health insurance Marketplaces?

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Your state's new online Marketplace, also called an Exchange, was created mostly for people without insurance from an employer. But anyone can use it to check out their options. 

As long as you live in the U.S., are a citizen, and aren't in jail, you can buy a policy on the Marketplace. 

Under health care reform, women will pay more than men.

Under health care reform, women will pay more than men.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

In the past, insurance companies didn't treat men and women equally. For instance, a 22-year-old woman might pay 150% more than a man for the same coverage. The Affordable Care Act now prevents insurance companies from charging higher rates based on your gender.

If you're pregnant, health reform will make:

If you're pregnant, health reform will make:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

In the past, some insurance companies considered pregnancy a pre-existing condition and could turn down pregnant women. The Affordable Care Act prevents companies from charging you more or denying you insurance because you have a pre-existing condition. Whatever your health history, insurance companies won't be able to keep you from enrolling.

Health care reform replaces private insurance with government plans.

Health care reform replaces private insurance with government plans.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The Affordable Care Act does not create any government-run insurance plans. Most people continue to enroll in an insurance policy through work. If you don't, you can buy a policy from the Marketplace. All the plans on your state's Marketplace are offered by private companies and not directly by the government.

When did the law go fully into effect?

When did the law go fully into effect?

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  • Correct Answer:

The Affordable Care Act took full effect Jan. 1, 2014. That's when most of the major changes happened -- like extending coverage to millions of Americans, using tax credits to make health care more affordable, and expanding Medicaid in some states.

Under health care reform, young adults can be covered under their parents' health insurance up to:

Under health care reform, young adults can be covered under their parents' health insurance up to:

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Before health care reform, young adults often went without health insurance. They were less likely to have a job that offered benefits. Now, a young adult can stay on their parents’ insurance policy until they turn 26, if the plan covers dependents. That is true even if they are offered coverage through their own employer, are married, and don’t live at home.

The Affordable Care Act cuts Medicare benefits for seniors.

The Affordable Care Act cuts Medicare benefits for seniors.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The Affordable Care Act doesn't cut benefits. Seniors on Medicare actually receive improved benefits, like better prescription drug coverage and yearly wellness exams.

The Affordable Care Act does cut Medicare spending. For example, it reduces payments to some providers and private insurers that offer coverage to people with Medicare. It also creates steps to prevent fraud and waste in government programs, among other efforts.

People who don't have insurance will have to pay a penalty.

People who don't have insurance will have to pay a penalty.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

If you don't have health insurance, you won't have to buy it. But you'll probably have to pay a penalty when you file your  taxes. 

Why the penalty? It's an incentive to get people to buy health insurance. A mix of healthy and sick people covered by insurance helps keep the costs down.

Health care reform will make your health insurance costs go up.

Health care reform will make your health insurance costs go up.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

Costs for some have gone down under health reform. That includes people with pre-existing medical conditions, some women, and older folks.

However, some people -- especially those who don’t qualify for financial help from the government -- have seen their costs rise. Insurance companies are no longer allowed to charge sick people more and must include more benefits as well as limit out-of-pocket costs. As a result, rates for private insurance, in some cases, have risen.

Reform will probably make it harder for people to find a doctor. 

Reform will probably make it harder for people to find a doctor. 

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The Affordable Care Act limits the tools insurers have used to keep costs down: charging sick people more or denying them insurance, charging more for pre-existing conditions and gender, or leaving out certain benefits. To hold down monthly premiums, many insurers have limited their provider networks.

Many people have had a tough time seeing their doctors or finding one close by who participates with their plan. The government said it will monitor insurers to make sure they include enough doctors.

Many preventive health services are covered by private health plans under health reform.

Many preventive health services are covered by private health plans under health reform.

  • Your Answer:
  • Correct Answer:

The Affordable Care Act requires health plans that began covering people on or after Sept. 23, 2010, to cover preventive services. Those include immunizations, mammograms, colonoscopies,  and health screenings. If you get any of these services, as well as several others, you won't have a co-pay, co-insurance, or a deductible. However, older policies -- from before that date -- may still require you to pay some portion of preventive care costs.

Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.
Your Score:     You correctly answered   out of   questions.

Nice job! You have a healthy knowledge of the health reform law. Keep following the news, as the law won’t take full effect until next year.

Good work! You're pretty familiar with what health reform has in store. You've got a good background to grow on. 

You're learning about health reform but have a ways to go. Read some more, and try the quiz again.

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