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Cemented or Uncemented Artificial Joints

Before surgery, the surgeon will decide whether to use cemented or uncemented joints based on your age and how your X-rays look. Or the surgeon may decide at the time of surgery, when he or she opens up the joint and can see how the bone looks. One type is not clearly better than the other. Doctors may be more likely to use uncemented joints in younger people whose bone is in good condition and likely to make a strong bond with the replacement component. They may use cemented joints in older people or those whose bone is weaker and less likely to make a strong bond with the replacement components.

Cemented joints form an immediate, strong bond to the bone but often loosen after 10 to 20 years. A cemented bond is strongest immediately after surgery and gets weaker over time. In contrast, uncemented joints form a bond that may be weaker at first but may form a strong permanent bond as the bone fills in the porous coating. After a strong bond has developed between the bone and the replacement components, uncemented joints are less likely to weaken or loosen over time. Most loosening that can be seen on an X-ray doesn't cause symptoms and is not a problem.

Recommended Related to Osteoarthritis

How to Make an Arthritis-Friendly Home

Your home should be a place where you feel safe and comfortable. But when you have arthritis, it may seem like your home is filled with obstacles, such as doors that are hard to open and lamps that are difficult to turn on. Assistive devices for arthritis can help make these everyday tasks easier. From opening small jars and bottles to getting out of the tub, these devices can ease the strain on your joints. These tools are available at your local pharmacy, hardware store, or medical supply store,...

Read the How to Make an Arthritis-Friendly Home article > >

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Stanford M. Shoor, MD - Rheumatology
Last Revised April 8, 2011

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: April 08, 2011
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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