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Whooping Cough Risk & Kids Who Miss Vaccinations

It's important to get all doses without delay, researchers say
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Sept. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Young children aged 3 months to 36 months who don't get all their doses of the diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine on schedule appear to be at increased risk for pertussis -- also known as whooping cough -- according to a new study.

Although vaccination rates in the United States are still high, a growing number of parents are concerned about vaccines and choosing to skip or delay them. These decisions, however, do have consequences, the researchers said.

"Children who aren't immunized on time are at greatly increased risk for pertussis compared to kids who are vaccinated on time," said lead researcher Jason Glanz, at the Institute for Health Research at Kaiser Permanente Colorado, in Denver.

These undervaccinated children miss their immunizations for a number of reasons, Glanz said. These include missed opportunities when getting checkups and limited access to care, as well as parents who don't want to have several vaccines given during a single office visit.

"The best data we have suggests that the current vaccine schedule is both safe and effective," Glanz said. "These alternative schedules may or may not be as safe, but they are certainly not as effective."

Doses of the DTaP vaccine are recommended at ages 2, 4 and 6 months, at 15 through 18 months, and at 4 through 6 years, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The report was published in the Sept. 9 online edition of the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

For the study, Glanz's team looked at cases of pertussis among children born between 2004 and 2008 and seen at eight managed care organizations. They identified 72 cases of pertussis and matched them with 288 similar children who didn't have the disease.

Of 72 children with pertussis, 34 (about 47 percent) had not gotten the recommended four doses of the DTaP vaccine -- compared with 64 (about 22 percent) of the children who didn't have the disease.

Children who weren't fully vaccinated for three or four doses of DTaP were about 18 and 28 times more likely, respectively, to have had pertussis than children who were fully vaccinated, the researchers found.

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