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Parkinson's Disease Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Parkinson's Disease

  1. Parkinson's Disease - Exams and Tests

    A diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is based on your medical history and a thorough neurological exam. There are no lab tests that can diagnose Parkinson's disease.

  2. Parkinson's Disease - What Happens

    What happens to a person with Parkinson's disease may vary from person to person. Symptoms of Parkinson's disease typically begin appearing between the ages 50 and 60.

  3. Parkinson's Disease - When To Call a Doctor

    See your doctor if your Parkinson's disease symptoms or your response to your medication change significantly.

  4. Parkinson's Disease - Surgery

    Some surgeries for Parkinson's disease, such as pallidotomy and thalamotomy, are hardly performed anymore. Neurotransplantation is a Parkinson's disease surgery that is still experimental.

  5. Parkinson's Disease - Symptoms

    The most common symptoms of Parkinson's disease include tremor or shaking, stiff muscles and achiness, limited movement, and difficulty with balance.

  6. Parkinson's Disease - Medications

    Medications are often used as treatment for Parkinson's disease symptoms. These drugs include levodopa and dopamine agonists.

  7. Parkinson's Disease Guide - Prevention

    There is no known way to prevent Parkinson's disease.

  8. Parkinson's Disease - Topic Overview

    Parkinson's Disease affects the way you move and occurs when certain nerve cells in the brain don't produce enough dopamine.

  9. Parkinson's Disease and Sexual Problems - Topic Overview

    Problems with sexual function in people with Parkinson's disease are common. Muscle stiffness and movement may make sexual activity difficult. Depression or anxiety may result in a loss of interest in sex or,in men,erection problems. These often can be improved by treatment with medicine. Parkinson's disease can affect the nerves that control the sexual organs. This may cause difficulty in ...

  10. Parkinson's Disease: Eating and Drooling Problems - Topic Overview

    Parkinson's disease can change many of the muscles used for speech, chewing, and swallowing. Changes in these muscles may cause:Weight loss and nutrition problems.Slow eating.Fatigue during eating.Food sticking in the throat.Coughing or choking on food or liquids.Trouble swallowing saliva, which causes drooling.Trouble swallowing pills.But there are things you can do to help reduce eating and drooling problems. A speech-language pathologist (also called a speech therapist) can teach you exercises and show you other ways to help with eating, swallowing, and drooling.Eating problemsYou can reduce eating problems by changing how and what you eat.Sit upright when eating, drinking, and taking pills.Take small bites of food, chew completely, and swallow before taking another bite.Take small sips of liquid, and hold them in your mouth as you prepare to swallow.If eating is tiring, divide food into smaller but more frequent meals.Thicker drinks make swallowing easier. Try milk shakes or

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