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How are UTIs treated?

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Bacteria cause most UTIs. If that’s the case for you, then you’ll need to take antibiotics. You might take antibiotics for a longer time, depending on how long you’ve had your UTI and whether you get them often, what caused the infection, and how well your medicines work. Also, men usually have to take antibiotics for weeks if the infection is in their prostate. That’s important to do to make sure the infection doesn’t cause serious problems. You’ll need to take all the pills in your prescription and follow the instructions to take them on time -- even after you start to feel better. You should also drink lots of water to help wash out the bacteria from your urinary system. If you have bladder pain and pain when you urinate, you may get a bladder anesthetic to curb irritation of the bladder and urethral lining. It normally tints the urine a reddish-orange color.

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians.

WomensHealth.gov: “Urinary tract infection fact sheet.”

The Urology Institute.

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on April 17, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

American Academy of Family Physicians.

WomensHealth.gov: “Urinary tract infection fact sheet.”

The Urology Institute.

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Nazia Q Bandukwala on April 17, 2018

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When is surgery needed for UTIs?

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