PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What should you know about a urinary tract infection (UTI)?

ANSWER

A urinary tract infection (UTI) affects your urinary tract. That’s the system though which your body gets rid of waste and extra water.

UTIs are most often caused by bacteria, but they can also be brought on by fungi or viruses. Normally, your body gets rid of these germs before they cause a problem. But if the germs win, you can get a painful UTI.

If you’ve ever had one, you know the telltale signs: an intense urge to pee, having to pee more often, peeing very little when you go, and a burning sensation when you pee. If you think you have a UTI, see your doctor. He’ll find out whether your symptoms are caused by that or another infection. He’ll also be able to prescribe antibiotics to treat it.

Can’t wait to find out if you have a UTI? A home test can help you find out faster.

From: Can I Take a Home Test for a UTI? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.” 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Urinary Tract Infection Fact Sheet.”

Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care : “Reliability of Dipstick Assay in Predicting Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 24, 2018

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: “Urinary Tract Infection.” 

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Urinary Tract Infection in Adults.”

Womenshealth.gov: “Urinary Tract Infection Fact Sheet.”

Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care : “Reliability of Dipstick Assay in Predicting Urinary Tract Infection.”

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 24, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How do home tests for a urinary tract infection (UTI) work?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.