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  • Question 1/10

    Should you pee on a jellyfish sting?

  • Answer 1/10

    Should you pee on a jellyfish sting?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Urine, or things like vinegar or alcohol, can make skin hurt even more. Use plain hot water and a pain reliever like lidocaine to numb the area. Saltwater also works. To avoid getting stung, keep an eye out for jellyfish while you’re swimming and on the beach. Even a dead one can sting you if you step on it.

  • Answer 1/10

    What can you eat to keep mosquitoes away?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Garlic wards off vampires in the movies, but there’s no proof it keeps real-life bloodsuckers at bay. Eating bananas, onions, or other foods won’t do the trick either. Use bug spray and wear pants and long sleeves when you’re outside to protect yourself.

  • Question 1/10

    Can you catch poison ivy from someone else?

  • Answer 1/10

    Can you catch poison ivy from someone else?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Nope, not even if you touch someone’s ivy-inflicted skin. You get an allergic reaction by touching the sticky oil that oozes from the plant itself. You’ll have an itchy, blistery rash that looks like streaks or lines.The saying about poison ivy goes, “Leaves of three, let them be” -- so watch out for plants with three-leaf clusters.

  • Question 1/10

    How long should you wait to swim after you eat?

  • Answer 1/10

    How long should you wait to swim after you eat?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Turns out mom was wrong. You don’t need to wait a specific amount of time before going back in the water. You should be fine to swim after a small meal or snack. Use common sense, though. If you jump back in after a big meal, you could get cramps or heartburn. 

  • Question 1/10

    Soak a washcloth in this to soothe sunburn pain:

  • Answer 1/10

    Soak a washcloth in this to soothe sunburn pain:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The milk makes a film that will ease the discomfort. And the coolness will dial down the hot feeling. Next time you go outside, cover up, use sunscreen, or head into the shade. And remember: Even a tan means your skin is unhappy.

  • Question 1/10

    What kills more people each year than shark attacks?

  • Answer 1/10

    What kills more people each year than shark attacks?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Sharks don’t usually hunt people. When they do, it’s often because they mistake us for sea turtles or other prey. But the reality is, more people die each year from accidents involving Christmas lights than shark attacks. Still, if they’ve been spotted in the water, stay away. And don’t take a dip in the ocean early in the morning, at dusk, or at night. That’s when they tend to look for food.

  • Question 1/10

    Try this to help get water out of your ear:

  • Answer 1/10

    Try this to help get water out of your ear:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If water stays in too long after a swim, you could get an ear infection. Tilt your head so it can run out. You can also pull your earlobe gently in different directions to drain the liquid. If that doesn’t work, use a blow dryer. Put it on the lowest heat and speed, and hold it a few inches away from your head. To keep water out in the first place, wear ear plugs or a swim cap.

  • Question 1/10

    Can you get a cold from air conditioning?

  • Answer 1/10

    Can you get a cold from air conditioning?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can’t blame your sniffles and sneezes on going from outdoor heat to indoor chill. Colds are caused by viruses, not by changes in the temperature. So just wash your hands often and stay away from sick people to help keep yourself healthy.

  • Question 1/10

    Can chlorine in pools kills germs on the spot?

  • Answer 1/10

    Can chlorine in pools kills germs on the spot?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Yes, chlorine kills some germs, but it won’t get rid of everything -- and it doesn’t work right away. So shower off before and after you take a dip. And try not to swallow the water, since it could make you sick if it has sweat, pee, or other yucky stuff in it. Also, stay out of the pool if you have diarrhea.

  • Question 1/10

    Which of these body parts can get sunburned?

  • Answer 1/10

    Which of these body parts can get sunburned?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Protect your peepers when you go outside, because too much sun can make them red, painful, and sensitive to light. They may also tear up a lot and feel like there’s dirt in them. Wear sunglasses with UVA/UVB protection and a wide-brimmed hat or cap to shield your face.

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    Let the sun shine! When it comes to summer health, you’re a pro. Great job!

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    Life’s a beach! You know how to tell many summer health myths from facts.

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    Don’t get the summertime blues! Study up and take the quiz again for a brighter result!

Sources | Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on August 25, 2017 Medically Reviewed on August 25, 2017

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on
August 25, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

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SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: “Poison Ivy, Oak, and Sumac,” “Poison Ivy: Signs and Symptoms.”

American College of Emergency Physicians: “Don’t Pee on That Jellyfish Sting!”

American Optometric Association: “Protecting Your Eyes from Solar Radiation.”

AARP: “Can Air Conditioning Increase Your Chance of Getting a Cold?”

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: “Wait a Half-Hour After Lunch Before Going Back in the Water – Or You Just Might Drown.”

CDC: “Common Cold and Runny Nose,” “Facts About ‘Swimmer’s Ear,” “Recreational Water Illnesses,” “Triple A’s of Healthy Swimming.”

Consumer Product Safety Commission: "2013 Fireworks Annual Report," "Treadmill Injury Statistics."

Kidshealth.org: “Jellyfish.”

National Marine Fisheries Service: “Frequently Asked Questions About Sharks.” 

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey: “Leaves of Three, Let Them Be!”

Skin Cancer Foundation: “Is a Tan Ever a Good Thing?” Worst Case Scenario: Treating Sunburn.”

University of Florida: “Mosquito Repellants.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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