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  • Question 1/8

    You can have heatstroke if your body temperature hits:

  • Answer 1/8

    You can have heatstroke if your body temperature hits:

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    • Correct Answer:

    If you’ve overdone it in really hot weather, watch for signs like nausea, confusion, fast breathing or heart rate, and headache. If you notice any of them, you need medical help right away.

  • Question 1/8

    Several days of heat and this can make you cranky and more aggressive:

  • Answer 1/8

    Several days of heat and this can make you cranky and more aggressive:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Hot, sticky days can make it hard to sleep. And because you’re sweating, it’s not easy to keep enough water in your body. Plus, you may feel like you have no choice but to stay inside. The end result: When the air’s like a sauna, your temper may flare.

  • Question 1/8

    When someone has a really low body temperature (hypothermia), you should put them under a heat lamp to warm them up.

  • Answer 1/8

    When someone has a really low body temperature (hypothermia), you should put them under a heat lamp to warm them up.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Direct heat can hurt their skin or cause their heart to beat irregularly. Don’t offer an electric blanket or heating pad, either. A few things that can help: Take off any wet clothes, cover them with blankets, and give them something warm to drink. Skin-to-skin contact is good, too.

  • Question 1/8

    You shouldn’t exercise outside when it’s below:

  • Answer 1/8

    You shouldn’t exercise outside when it’s below:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Even if you don’t have asthma, you might feel like you do if you try to work up a sweat in really cold weather. Frigid, dry air can make your airways smaller and cause something called exercise-induced asthma. You might cough, wheeze, feel a tightness in your chest, or find it hard to breathe.

    These symptoms should go away when you take a break if they were caused by the cold. If they don’t, call 911.

  • Question 1/8

    People with arthritis may have more pain in their joints before rainy or cold weather, likely because of a change in:

  • Answer 1/8

    People with arthritis may have more pain in their joints before rainy or cold weather, likely because of a change in:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This force (also called barometric pressure) pushes against your body from the outside. When bad weather is on the way, the pressure drops and the tissues in your body can swell. This can cause you pain.

  • Answer 1/8

    Migraines can be triggered by:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Not only can these things bring on migraines, but they also can make one you have worse. Other weather-related triggers include bright sunlight, dry air, and drops in barometric pressure.

  • Question 1/8

    Your allergies might bother you more on a:

  • Answer 1/8

    Your allergies might bother you more on a:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There is a bright side to cloudy, rainy days: They can give you a break from your allergies. Pollen moves around when it’s warm, dry, and windy. This can make your watery eyes and sneezing worse.

  • Answer 1/8

    It may help you lose weight to:

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    • Correct Answer:

    When it’s cold, we burn more calories to make heat. So if you’re trying to lose weight, that over-air conditioned office, store, or waiting room may not be such a bad thing.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Hot! Hot! Hot! You know your weather facts.

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    Not bad, but you should get outside a little more often.

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    You’re cold as ice! Warm up a bit and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on June 25, 2018 Medically Reviewed on June 25, 2018

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on
June 25, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Absodels / Getty Images

 

SOURCES:

American Academy of Asthma, Allergies, & Immunology: “Outdoor Allergens.”

Arthritis Foundation of Western Australia: “Aches and Pains During Cold and Wet Weather.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Cold Weather Can Give You Exercise-Induced Asthma.”

Joslin Diabetes Center: “Turning Up the Heat on Brown Fat.”

LiveScience: “Why We Get Cranky When It’s Hot Out.”

Mayo Clinic: “Can weather changes trigger migraines?” “Heatstroke,” “Hypothermia.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.