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When should you get help for a gout flare-up?

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It's always a good idea to let your doctor know that you are having a flare. Sometimes, you may need to follow up to make sure your treatment plan is working or if your symptoms don't improve. Call your doctor if:

  • This is your first flare-up. There are several other conditions, such as a joint infection, that have some of the same symptoms as gout attacks.
  • You have a high fever and chills. Gout attack symptoms may include a mild fever, but a higher temperature may be a sign of an infection.
  • Your symptoms don't get any better after 48 hours or don't end after about a week. If you don't start to feel somewhat better after a few days, call your doctor. He or she may suggest a different treatment. Most gout attacks will go away by themselves in seven to 10 days even without treatment.

From: How to Treat Gout Attacks at Home WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Rebecca Manno, MD, MHS, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Robert T. Keenan, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology and immunology, Duke University School of Medicine.

Scott Zashin, MD, clinical professor of medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School; attending physician, Presbyterian Hospital.

Lan Chen, MD, PhD, attending rheumatologist, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

Gout and Pseudogout Treatment & Management: "Treatment."

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Gout -- Treatments for Gout."

Merck Manual: "Gout."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 2, 2019

SOURCES:

Rebecca Manno, MD, MHS, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Robert T. Keenan, MD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine, division of rheumatology and immunology, Duke University School of Medicine.

Scott Zashin, MD, clinical professor of medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School; attending physician, Presbyterian Hospital.

Lan Chen, MD, PhD, attending rheumatologist, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center.

Gout and Pseudogout Treatment & Management: "Treatment."

Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center: "Gout -- Treatments for Gout."

Merck Manual: "Gout."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on April 2, 2019

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