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I am being treated for cancer that has advanced, and I want to talk about what’s new in genomic testing for my cancer.

What to Ask Your Doctor

  • What’s the difference between genetic and genomic testing?

    Understanding the difference between these two types of tests and what they can tell you will help you make an informed decision about your care as quickly as possible.

  • Is genomic testing part of standard cancer treatment?

    It’s important to know all your options for diagnosis and treatment as early as possible. You’ll want to talk with your doctor about available treatments and how yours will be designed for your needs.

  • Is genomic testing appropriate for the type of cancer that I have?

    You don’t want to waste time and money on unnecessary tests. Your doctor can tell you if the results of a genomic test will affect the treatment plan for your type of cancer.

     
  • How is genomic testing done?

    The type of tissue needed for a genomic test depends on the type of cancer you have. Your care team will explain the procedure that’s typically used for your specific cancer and give you options if they’re available.

  • What does genomic testing for cancer cost?

    All medical testing comes with costs and can vary widely. You’ll need to know the costs of these tests and how much your insurance plan will cover, if anything, up front.

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Add to Calendar America/New_York I am being treated for cancer that has advanced, and I want to talk about what’s new in genomic testing for my cancer. <ul><li><p class="ddg_question">What’s the difference between genetic and genomic testing?</p><p>Understanding the difference between these two types of tests and what they can tell you will help you make an informed decision about your care as quickly as possible.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">Is genomic testing part of standard cancer treatment?</p><p>It’s important to know all your options for diagnosis and treatment as early as possible. You’ll want to talk with your doctor about available treatments and how yours will be designed for your needs.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">Is genomic testing appropriate for the type of cancer that I have?</p><p>You don’t want to waste time and money on unnecessary tests. Your doctor can tell you if the results of a genomic test will affect the treatment plan for your type of cancer.</p><div class="ad ad-2026 tabAdsection" id="ads2-pos-2026-ad-tab-1"> </div></li><li><p class="ddg_question">How is genomic testing done?</p><p>The type of tissue needed for a genomic test depends on the type of cancer you have. Your care team will explain the procedure that’s typically used for your specific cancer and give you options if they’re available.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">What does genomic testing for cancer cost?</p><p>All medical testing comes with costs and can vary widely. You’ll need to know the costs of these tests and how much your insurance plan will cover, if anything, up front.</p></li></ul>

I have cancer that has advanced, and I have questions about how genomic testing might be used to develop my treatment plan.

What to Ask Your Doctor

  • Can genomic testing help me find the right treatment for my cancer?

    Your doctor will base your treatment plan on many different things. They can tell you if genomic testing would be useful in making or changing that plan, and what treatments to rule out.

  • I had a genomic test panel done earlier in my treatment. Do I need another?

    Mutations in cancer cells can happen while you’re being treated. Your doctor will be able to tell you if this has happened in your case and if the info from another test will help in adjusting your treatment.

  • Can genomic testing tell me if my cancer is likely to come back (recur)?

    One of the things that may guide your treatment is how likely it is to come back. Your doctor will talk about this with you and explain what tests they may use to determine the odds in your case.

     
  • When should I have genomic testing done?

    The cancer journey is different for every patient, and treatments plans can change. Your doctor will let you know if this type of testing is needed at any point in your treatment.

  • Can the results of genomic testing help me find a clinical trial?

    Clinical trials are a way to test new treatments before the FDA has approved them for everyone. Your doctor can tell you if the information from a genomic test could be useful in finding a clinical trial that you’re eligible for.

Print
Add to Calendar America/New_York I have cancer that has advanced, and I have questions about how genomic testing might be used to develop my treatment plan. <ul><li><p class="ddg_question">Can genomic testing help me find the right treatment for my cancer?</p><p>Your doctor will base your treatment plan on many different things. They can tell you if genomic testing would be useful in making or changing that plan, and what treatments to rule out.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">I had a genomic test panel done earlier in my treatment. Do I need another?</p><p>Mutations in cancer cells can happen while you’re being treated. Your doctor will be able to tell you if this has happened in your case and if the info from another test will help in adjusting your treatment.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">Can genomic testing tell me if my cancer is likely to come back (recur)?</p><p>One of the things that may guide your treatment is how likely it is to come back. Your doctor will talk about this with you and explain what tests they may use to determine the odds in your case.</p><div class="ad ad-2026 tabAdsection" id="ads2-pos-2026-ad-tab-2"> </div></li><li><p class="ddg_question">When should I have genomic testing done?</p><p>The cancer journey is different for every patient, and treatments plans can change. Your doctor will let you know if this type of testing is needed at any point in your treatment.</p></li><li><p class="ddg_question">Can the results of genomic testing help me find a clinical trial?</p><p>Clinical trials are a way to test new treatments before the FDA has approved them for everyone. Your doctor can tell you if the information from a genomic test could be useful in finding a clinical trial that you’re eligible for.</p></li></ul>
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