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What are diopters for reading glasses?

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If you decide to try a pair of inexpensive "readers" you see at drug stores, look for the number on the tag that's on them. Reading glass power is measured in units called diopters. The lowest strength is usually 1.00 diopters. Glasses go up in strength by factors of .25 (1.50, 1.75, 2.00). The strongest glasses are 4.00 diopters.

From: Do I Need Reading Glasses? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Do I need store-bought or prescription reading glasses after cataract surgery?" "Eye Exams 101."

American Optometric Association: "Adult Vision: 41 to 60 Years of Age," "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Cleveland Clinic: "How to Choose Perfect Drug Store Reading Glasses."

Mayo Clinic: "Presbyopia Symptoms," "Presbyopia Tests and Diagnosis."

National Institute on Aging: "Aging and Your Eyes."

National Women's Health Resource Center: "When the print is too small."

The College of Optometrists: "Ready Made Reading Glasses."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on November 20, 2016

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Do I need store-bought or prescription reading glasses after cataract surgery?" "Eye Exams 101."

American Optometric Association: "Adult Vision: 41 to 60 Years of Age," "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Cleveland Clinic: "How to Choose Perfect Drug Store Reading Glasses."

Mayo Clinic: "Presbyopia Symptoms," "Presbyopia Tests and Diagnosis."

National Institute on Aging: "Aging and Your Eyes."

National Women's Health Resource Center: "When the print is too small."

The College of Optometrists: "Ready Made Reading Glasses."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on November 20, 2016

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How do I pick out reading glasses?

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