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What is a normal body temperature?

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Not everyone’s “normal” body temperature is the same. Yours could be a whole degree different than someone else’s. A German doctor in the 19th century set the standard at 98.6°F, but more recent studies say the baseline for most people is closer to 98.2°F.

For a typical adult, body temperature can be anywhere from 97°F to 99°F. Babies and children have a little higher range; it lies between 97.9°F to 100.4°F.

From: What Is Normal Body Temperature? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Kids Health: “Fever and Taking Your Child’s Temperature.”

Mayo Clinic: “Fever: First Aid,” “Fever,” “Hypothermia.”

Paediatrics & Child’s Health : “How to take a child’s temperature.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Vital Signs (Body Temperature, Pulse Rate, Respiration Rate, Blood Pressure)."

Cleveland Clinic: “Your Child’s Fevers: 5 Common Myths Debunked.”

American Family Physician : “Evaluation of Fever in Infants and Young Children.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 05, 2017

SOURCES:

Kids Health: “Fever and Taking Your Child’s Temperature.”

Mayo Clinic: “Fever: First Aid,” “Fever,” “Hypothermia.”

Paediatrics & Child’s Health : “How to take a child’s temperature.”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Vital Signs (Body Temperature, Pulse Rate, Respiration Rate, Blood Pressure)."

Cleveland Clinic: “Your Child’s Fevers: 5 Common Myths Debunked.”

American Family Physician : “Evaluation of Fever in Infants and Young Children.”

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on February 05, 2017

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What can make my body temperature change?

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