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What are the most important surfaces to disinfect to prevent spread of the coronavirus??

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The answer is simple: any and all things that you touch should be disinfected and you should disinfect them often. What we now know is that the coronavirus can survive for several hours. Different surfaces even allow the virus to survive for days.

Based on recently published studies, we know that COVID-19 can survive and remain in the air and on various surfaces for extended periods of time. Since infection can be spread by both symptomatic and asymptomatic people, frequently disinfecting common areas, social distancing, and keeping those most at risk safe are smart steps for staying healthy and slowing this outbreak.

Researchers first look at the survival of the coronavirus in air in a lab. They sprayed enough virus in the air to simulate the amount of virus similar to that found in the upper and lower respiratory tract of humans. They also used this to infect those surfaces mentioned above.

They found that COVID-19 can remain viable in the air for at least 3 hours.

They were also able to show that SARS-CoV-2 is more stable on plastic and stainless steel than on copper or cardboard; it was detectable and still viable on some of these surfaces for up to 3 days.

The bottom line is that the virus did a fairly good job of surviving in the lab, simple steps such as handwashing, disinfecting and social distancing keeps us all stay.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 24, 2020
Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 24, 2020

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Does pregnancy make you more susceptible to getting the coronavirus?

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