WebMD's On the Street: Working Dad

Our experts advise Tay Person on increasing flexibility and learning not to sweat the small stuff.

From the WebMD Archives

"On the Street" profiles a WebMD the Magazine reader and his or her personal health challenges. We then tap top medical and healthy lifestyle experts for answers and solutions. In the October 2012 issue, Tay Person, 35, an implementation consultant from Somers Point, N.J., seeks help with increasing his flexibility, reducing his stress, preventing back pain, and coping with excessive perspiration.

"A Source of Anxiety"

Working with kids and raising your own isn't exactly child's play. Tay Person, a former teacher, knows that all too well. He and his wife, Jen, a teacher, are parents to Bella, 6, Lilli, 3, and Nola, 18 months. Person travels frequently for his job with Scholastic. 'My daughters don't like when I'm gone, and I don't like to be away from them. It's definitely a source of anxiety," he says, citing recent skin breakouts he thinks were stress-related.

Person, a one-time bodybuilding champ, regularly carves out time for cardio and strength training, but he wants to spend more time -- which is hard to come by -- increasing his flexibility. 'Over the past two years, I've injured my lower back twice.” And with his frequent trips to the gym, athlete's foot is top of mind, too. Person tries not to sweat the small stuff, but he's bothered by excessive perspiration. 'I have tried Certain Dri and just about every clinical-strength deodorant on the market,” he says. But no matter the season, his dress shirts still tell the story.  

Cope with Separation Anxiety

If anxiety increases when you're on the road and miss your girls, it might help the whole family to track your schedule, carry family photos, call or video chat often, and maybe try meditation (check out The Relaxation Response by Herbert Benson, MD, for simple techniques).

Jeffrey P. Kahn, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York City

Break the Excessive Sweat

Use an antiperspirant at bedtime and a deodorant in the morning. Sweat production is lowest at night, giving active ingredients a better chance to get into your pores. Glide, stick, spray, or roll on wherever sweating is a problem -- hands, feet, face, back, chest, and even groin. If this doesn't help within a month, you may have a condition called hyperhidrosis, which can be treated with prescription-strength antiperspirants or Botox injections.

Continued

David M. Pariser, MD, dermatologist, dermatology professor at Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Va., and founding board member, International Hyperhidrosis Society

Prevent Back Pain

I recommend at least 10 minutes of stretching a day to start. To help keep the spine flexible, when sitting at your desk, imagine ice water being poured down your back. The thought will have you sitting tall -- and reducing neck and back stress.

Also, pretend you're playing the piano with your toes. Keeping toes limber can help with overall flexibility.

Jay Cardiello, founder of the JCORE Accelerated Body Transformation System, and celebrity trainer, New York City

Fight Athlete's Foot

Wash your feet nightly with Nizoral or Selsun Blue shampoo to help kill fungus. Then apply an over-the-counter antifungal cream all over your feet, between the toes, and on the toenails. You can also try AmLactin, a lactic acid lotion that smooths and moisturizes the feet while inhibiting fungal growth. If this regimen doesn't work, see your doctor for prescription antifungal tablets.

David Colbert, MD founder, New York Dermatology Group and Colbert MD skin care

Want to be our next WebMD on the Street star? Email us your health issues at [email protected] We might come to your city!

Find more articles, browse back issues, and read the current issue of "WebMD the Magazine."

WebMD Magazine - Feature Reviewed by Michael W. Smith, MD on August 14, 2012

Sources

SOURCES:

Tay Person, implementation consultant, Somers Point, N.J.

Jeffrey P. Kahn, MD, clinical associate professor of psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, N.Y.

David M. Pariser, MD, dermatologist; dermatology professor at Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, Va.; founding board member, International Hyperhidrosis Society.

David Colbert, MD founder, New York Dermatology Group; founder

Colbert MD skin care products.

Jay Cardiello, founder of the JCORE Accelerated Body Transformation System, and celebrity trainer, New York, N.Y.

© 2012 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.

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