Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Information and Resources

Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a very rare, life-threatening condition that can affect adults and children.

In cavernous sinus thrombosis, a blood clot blocks a vein that runs through a hollow space underneath the brain and behind the eye sockets. These veins carry blood from the face and head back to the heart.

The cause of cavernous sinus thrombosis is usually an infection. But other factors may play a role.   

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a serious condition. It causes death in 30% to 50% of cases.

Symptoms of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

Symptoms of cavernous sinus thrombosis may include:

  • Severe headache
  • Swelling, redness, or irritation around one or both eyes
  • Drooping eyelids
  • Inability to move the eye
  • High fever
  • Pain or numbness around the face or eyes
  • Fatigue
  • Vision loss or double vision
  • Seizures

 

Causes of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is typically caused by an infection that has spread beyond the face, sinuses, or teeth. Less commonly, infections of the ears or eyes may cause cavernous sinus thrombosis.

To contain the infection, the body's immune system creates a clot to prevent bacteria or other pathogens from spreading. The clot increases pressure inside the brain. This pressure can damage the brain and may ultimately cause death.

Rarely, cavernous sinus thrombosis may also be caused by a severe blow to the head.

Cavernous sinus thrombosis is more common in people who take certain medications or who have underlying health conditions that may increase their risk for blood clots.

Tests for Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

Doctors may order brain scans, including CT and MRI scans, to look for cavernous sinus thrombosis. They may also test blood or spinal fluid to check for signs of infection.

Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Thrombosis

Doctors treat cavernous sinus thrombosis with high-dose antibiotics. These are usually given though an IV drip.

Corticosteroid medications may also be used to reduce swelling. Blood thinners are sometimes given.

If a patient doesn't respond immediately to medication, surgery is usually necessary to drain fluid from the brain.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on February 02, 2014

Hot Topics

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors

WebMD Video: Now Playing

Click here to wach video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Which sex is the worst about washing up? Why is it so important? We’ve got the dirty truth on how and when to wash your hands.

Click here to watch video: Dirty Truth About Hand Washing

Popular Slideshows & Tools on WebMD

tea
What you should eat.
Woman sitting in front of UV lights
Is yours working?
woman using breath spray
What's causing yours?
colon xray
Get the facts.
MS Overview
Recognizing symptoms.
bowl of yogurt with heart shape
Eat for a healthy heart.
woman doing pushups
To help you get fit.
Colored x-ray of tooth decay
Know what to look for.
Woman sitting with child
Do you know the symptoms?
fruit drinks
Foods that can help you focus.
Sad dog and guacamole
Don't feed this to your dog.
Thyroid exam
See how much you know.

Women's Health Newsletter

Find out what women really need.