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5. Insect Sting continued...

Do this:

  • Make yourself unattractive to insects. Don’t wear brightly colored clothes and avoid scented lotions or cosmetics.
  • Keep insecticide handy, wear shoes outdoors, and stay away from outdoor garbage.
  • Talk to your doctor about allergy shots. They can help prevent anaphylaxis.

If you get stung:

  • Try to remove the stinger safely. You can take an antihistamine by mouth to reduce itching, swelling, and hives.
  • Try a pain reliever and use an ice pack to dull pain caused by the sting. In some cases, people get corticosteroids to curb swelling and inflammation.
  • If you have symptoms of anaphylaxis, you need to use an epinephrine auto injector (Auvi-Q or EpiPen) and call 911. 


6. Latex

You may have a mild reaction, like itchy red skin, from latex in gloves, condoms, or other things. If it’s a true latex allergy, you could also have symptoms like:

  • Teary, irritated eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Cough
  • Wheezing

It’s less common, but some people can have anaphylaxis from latex.

To treat this allergy, you may need to take antihistamines. Your doctor may also recommend you keep an epinephrine auto injector (Auvi-Q or EpiPen) with you at all times in case of emergency.

Do this:

  • Avoid anything that has latex in it.
  • Wear a bracelet that lets people know you have a latex allergy.
  • If you have an anaphylactic reaction, immediately use an epinephrine auto-injector and call 911.

Find allergy relief fast at Walgreens.